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The Awakening
Vocabulary

Extra Credit Words with Sample Sentences from the Book

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alacrity
2 uses
Victor Lebrun ... accepted with alacrity.
alacrity = eagerness
DefinitionGenerally alacrity means:
quickness; and/or cheerful eagerness
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1st useChapter 18
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arbitrary
1 use
And Nature takes no account of moral consequences, of arbitrary conditions which we create, and which we feel obliged to maintain at any cost.
arbitrary = not based on "reality"
DefinitionGenerally arbitrary means:
based on chance or impulse (rather than upon reasoning, consistent rules, or a proper sense of fairness)
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Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
SATtop 1000
1st useChapter 38
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desultory
1 use
In the lulls, Robert and his mother exchanged bits of desultory conversation.
desultory = lacking plan or purpose (jumping from one topic to the next)
DefinitionGenerally desultory means:
lacking plan or purpose; or half-hearted
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1st useChapter 8
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efface
1 use
They were women who idolized their children, worshiped their husbands, and esteemed it a holy privilege to efface themselves as individuals and grow wings as ministering angels.
efface = remove completely
DefinitionGenerally efface means:
remove completely from recognition or memory — sometimes by erasing

or:

to make oneself inconspicuous or unimportant
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1st useChapter 4
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effrontery
1 use
He stood close to her, and the effrontery in his eyes repelled the old, vanishing self in her, yet drew all her awakening sensuousness.
effrontery = impolite boldness
DefinitionGenerally effrontery means:
rude and disrespectful behavior — often made by someone who does not realize they are being rude — as when someone is presumptuous or impolitely bold
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1st useChapter 25
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expedient
1 use
She was visited by no more outbursts, moving her to such futile expedients.
expedients = actions that are speedy or practical
DefinitionGenerally expedient means:
a practical action — especially one that accepts negative tradeoffs due to circumstances

or:

convenient, speedy, or practical
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1st useChapter 19
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extraneous
2 uses
It had crossed her thought like some unsought, extraneous impression.
extraneous = not relevant or important to the matter under consideration
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1st useChapter 18
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immutable
1 use
Victor Lebrun objected; and his decrees were as immutable as those of Fate.
immutable = not subject or susceptible to change
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1st useChapter 9
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impervious
1 use
But she did not want to appear unamiable and uninterested, so she had brought forth newspapers, which she spread upon the floor of the gallery, and under Madame Ratignolle's directions she had cut a pattern of the impervious garment.
impervious = not admitting passage through (in this case, not permitting cold to penetrate)
DefinitionGenerally impervious means:
not admitting passage through; or not capable of being affected
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Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 4
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ingenuous
1 use
With ingenuous frankness he spoke of what a wicked, ill-disciplined boy he had been, and impulsively drew up his cuff to exhibit upon his wrist the scar from a saber cut which he had received in a duel outside of Paris when he was nineteen.
ingenuous = unsophisticated directness (not trying to present events in a manner that made him look better)
DefinitionGenerally ingenuous means:
innocent as in lacking in sophistication or worldliness — especially in being direct and not masking feelings
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1st useChapter 25
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insidious
1 use
They were designed for winter wear, when treacherous drafts came down chimneys and insidious currents of deadly cold found their way through key-holes.
insidious = treacherous
DefinitionGenerally insidious means:
not appearing dangerous, but actually very harmful over time

or:

treacherous  (dangerous due to trickery or from hidden or unpredictable risks)
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1st useChapter 4
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poignant
2 uses
with its soulful and poignant longing.
poignant = profoundly touching the emotions
DefinitionGenerally poignant means:
profoundly touching the emotions —  especially sadness or pity
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1st useChapter 15
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pretentious
2 uses
Robert's voice was not pretentious.
pretentious = trying to appear overly impressive
DefinitionGenerally pretentious means:
acting more impressive than is deserved
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1st useChapter 14
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profuse
2 uses
He was quite portly, with a profusion of gray hair, and small blue eyes which age had robbed of much of their brightness but none of their penetration.
profusion = abundance (a lot of something)
DefinitionGenerally profuse means:
abundant (a lot of something)
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Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 22
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remonstrate
2 uses
he immediately wrote her a letter of unqualified disapproval and remonstrance.
remonstrance = argument in protest or opposition
DefinitionGenerally remonstrate means:
argue in protest or opposition
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Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 32
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scrupulous
2 uses
In the yard, which was kept scrupulously neat, were flowers and plants of every description which flourishes in South Louisiana.
scrupulously = with great care
DefinitionGenerally scrupulous means:
careful to behave ethically and/or diligently (with great care and attention to detail)
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Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 17
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supercilious
1 use
She was not a supercilious or an over-dainty woman.
supercilious = arrogant
DefinitionGenerally supercilious means:
showing arrogant disdain of those one views as unworthy
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Library1 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 10
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torpid
1 use
He had detected the latent sensuality, which unfolded under his delicate sense of her nature's requirements like a torpid, torrid, sensitive blossom.
torpid = slow
DefinitionGenerally torpid means:
of people:  slow or inactive — usually resulting from a lack of energy and interest

or:

of animals:  a condition of biological rest or suspended animation — (could be in the evening, during the cold, or as in a dormant state all winter)
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Library1 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 35
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vivacious
2 uses
There were Mr. and Mrs. Merriman, a pretty, vivacious little woman in the thirties; her husband, a jovial fellow, something of a shallow-pate, who laughed a good deal at other people's witticisms, and had thereby made himself extremely popular.
vivacious = with engaging liveliness
DefinitionGenerally vivacious means:
an engaging liveliness
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Library1 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 30
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whimsical
2 uses
remembering Edna's whimsical turn of mind of late
whimsical = impulsive
DefinitionGenerally whimsical means:
playful or amusing

or:

determined by chance or impulse rather than by necessity or reason
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Book2 uses
Library1 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 22
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