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Babbitt
Vocabulary

Extra Credit Words with Sample Sentences from the Book

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aesthetic
1 use
He knew himself to be of a breeding altogether more esthetic and sensitive than Thompson's. He was a college graduate, he played golf, he often smoked cigarettes instead of cigars, and when he went to Chicago he took a room with a private bath.
esthetic = beautiful, tasteful, or related to beauty or taste
DefinitionGenerally aesthetic means:
related to beauty or good taste — often referring to one's appreciation of beauty or one's sense of what is beautiful

or:

beautiful or tasteful
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 6
Web Links
apathy
1 use
He accepted Frink with vast apathy; he grunted, "Poor boob!"
apathy = lack of interest and enthusiasm
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 23
Web Links
candid
2 uses
He was supple and swift and flushed; his eyes (which he believed to be cynical) were candidly eager.
candidly = with honesty and directness
DefinitionGenerally candid means:
honest and direct
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 2
Web Links
censure
2 uses
If he took her to dinner, if he were seen by censorious friends—But he went on ardently:
censorious = tending to express harsh criticism
DefinitionGenerally censure means:
harsh criticism; or formal criticism from an organization — such as the U.S. Senate
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 24
Web Links
complacent
2 uses
In contrast to the complacent Myra he saw her as swift and air-borne and radiant, a fire-spirit tenderly stooping to the hearth
complacent = contented (satisfied and unworried)
DefinitionGenerally complacent means:
contented (unworried and satisfied) — often to a fault
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 4
Web Links
compulsion
3 uses
He felt a compulsion back to all the standards he had so vaguely yet so desperately been fleeing.
compulsion = a strong (possibly uncontrollable) urge to do something
DefinitionGenerally compulsion means:
a strong (possibly uncontrollable) urge to do something; or force or a requirement that forces an action
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 29
Web Links
deride
2 uses
Under this derision Babbitt became more matter-of-fact.
derision = disrespect — typically while laughing at or making fun of
DefinitionGenerally deride means:
laugh at or make fun of—while showing a lack of respect
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 33
Web Links
eccentric
2 uses
His daughter Verona eccentrically took baths in the morning, now and then.
eccentrically = unconventional or strange; or a person with such traits
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1
Web Links
futile
2 uses
It was coming to him that perhaps all life as he knew it and vigorously practised it was futile;
futile = pointless effort
DefinitionGenerally futile means:
effort that is pointless because it is unproductive or unsuccessful
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library8 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 15
Web Links
hackneyed
1 use
The men leaned back on their heels, put their hands in their trousers-pockets, and proclaimed their views with the booming profundity of a prosperous male repeating a thoroughly hackneyed statement about a matter of which he knows nothing whatever.
hackneyed = writing that befits a hack writer; i.e., writing that is unimaginative and filled with overused expressions, ideas, and formulas
DefinitionGenerally hackneyed means:
lacking impact due to too much previous exposure — especially writing that is unimaginative and filled with overused expressions, ideas, and formulas
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 8
Web Links
illustrate
2 uses
1  —2 uses as in:
an illustrated children's book
It was lofty and half-timbered, with Tudor leaded casements, an oriel, a somewhat musicianless musicians'-gallery, and tapestries believed to illustrate the granting of Magna Charta.†
illustrate = draw pictures to accompany
DefinitionGenerally this sense of illustrate means:
to draw pictures (or provide photographs) to accompany a book or other writing
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 5
Web Links
incredulous
4 uses
Babbitt incredulously saw that it was Chum Frink.
incredulously = with disbelief
DefinitionGenerally incredulous means:
unbelieving; or having difficulty accepting something so unexpected
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library11 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 20
Web Links
indolent
1 use
If people had ever lived and loved here, read thrillers at midnight and lain in beautiful indolence on a Sunday morning, there were no signs of it.
indolence = laziness
DefinitionGenerally this sense of indolent means:
lazy; disinclined to work
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2
Web Links
inevitable
4 uses
At dinner, when his wife began the inevitable, he bellowed, "I forbid any of you to say a word about Paul!"
inevitable = certain to happen
DefinitionGenerally inevitable means:
certain to happen (even if one tried to prevent it)
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library21 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 4
Web Links
pious
5 uses
1  —2 uses as in:
a pious hypocrite
And crooked—Say, if I told the prosecuting attorney what I know about this last Street Traction option steal, both you and me would go to jail, along with some nice, clean, pious, high-up traction guns!
pious = self-righteous (acting as though one is highly moral when it is not true)
DefinitionGenerally this sense of pious means:
self-righteous (acting as though one is, or believing one is highly moral when it is not true)
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 10
Web Links
unquizzed meaning  —3 uses
reticent
4 uses
"Yuh—" Then he was pouring it out nakedly, robbed of reticence.
reticence = reluctance
DefinitionGenerally reticent means:
reluctant — especially to speak freely
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 5
Web Links
revere
13 uses
she did her work with the thoroughness of a mind which reveres details and never quite understands them;
reveres = respects and admires
DefinitionGenerally revere means:
regard with feelings of deep respect and admiration — sometimes with a mixture of wonder and awe or fear
Word Statistics
Book13 uses
Library12 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 10
Web Links
scrupulous
1 use
He performed the rite scrupulously.
scrupulously = diligently or carefully
DefinitionGenerally scrupulous means:
careful to behave ethically and/or diligently (with great care and attention to detail)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 12
Web Links
stoic
1 use
Every truck that made its way from the factories to the freight-stations was guarded by a policeman, trying to look stoical beside the scab driver.
stoical = not showing emotion
DefinitionGenerally stoic means:
seeming unaffected by pleasure, pain, or emotions
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 27
Web Links
zeal
2 uses
They spoke with zeal of the coming baseball season.
zeal = active interest and enthusiasm
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 13
Web Links
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