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vocabulary
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The Age of Innocence
Vocabulary

Top-Ranked Words with Sample Sentences from the Book

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allude
20 uses
it was against all the rules of their code that the mother and son should ever allude to what was uppermost in their thoughts
allude = refer (even indirectly)
DefinitionGenerally allude means:
to make an indirect reference
Word Statistics
Book20 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
SATtop 100
1st useChapter 15
Web Links
betrothed
18 uses
Nothing about his betrothed pleased him more than her resolute determination to carry to its utmost limit that ritual of ignoring the "unpleasant" in which they had both been brought up.
betrothed = the person he promised to marry
DefinitionGenerally betrothed means:
promised to marry; or the person who has promised to marry
Word Statistics
Book18 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1
Web Links
candid
6 uses
May met the question with her unshaken candour.
candour = honesty and directness
DefinitionGenerally candid means:
honest and direct
Word Statistics
Book6 uses
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
SATtop 500
1st useChapter 8
Web Links
convention
10 uses
1  —10 uses as in:
conventional behavior
...she had managed to brush away the conventions and make him feel that to seek to be alone was the natural thing for two old friends who had so much to say to each other....
conventions = things regarded as normal
DefinitionGenerally this sense of convention means:
something regarded as normal or typical
Word Statistics
Book10 uses
Library8 uses in 10 avg bks
SATtop 100
1st useChapter 12
Web Links
countenance   (2 meanings)
2 meanings, 3 uses
1  —1 use as in:
a pleasant countenance
After that there was still time to review, one by one, the familiar countenances in the first rows;
countenances = faces
DefinitionGenerally this sense of countenance means:
facial expression; or face; or composure
Word Statistics
Book1 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 19
Web Links
2  —2 uses as in:
giving countenance
That is just like the extraordinary things that foreigners invent about us. They think we dine at two o'clock and countenance divorce!
countenance = approve of
DefinitionGenerally this sense of countenance means:
to tolerate, approve, or show favor or support
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 33
Web Links
defer
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
deferred the decision
difficulties deferred
deferred = postponed (put off until another time)
DefinitionGenerally this sense of defer means:
postpone (hold off until a later time)
Word Statistics
Book1 uses
Library1 uses in 10 avg bks
SATtop 1000
1st useChapter 30
Web Links
deride
4 uses
his wife's efforts to represent him as a man of forceful character and marked intellectual ability (if he had only "chosen") had been met with a derisive chuckle.
derisive = treatment as inferior and unworthy of respect
DefinitionGenerally deride means:
laugh at or make fun of—while showing a lack of respect
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 15
Web Links
diatribe
1 use
But I hear there are pressing reasons for our friend Lawrence's diatribe:
diatribe = a strongly felt and usually lengthy criticism of something or someone
Word Statistics
Book1 uses
Library1 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 33
Web Links
duplicity
1 use
The bank had continued to take in money for a whole day after its failure was inevitable; and as many of its clients belonged to one or another of the ruling clans, Beaufort's duplicity seemed doubly cynical.
duplicity = deception — such as lying
DefinitionGenerally duplicity means:
deception (lying to or misleading others) — usually over an extended period
Word Statistics
Book1 uses
Library1 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 28
Web Links
irony   (2 meanings)
2 meanings, 2 uses
1  —1 use as in:
situational irony
it shed an ironic light on the situation to know...
ironic = indicating that what happened is very different than what might have be expected
DefinitionGenerally this sense of irony means:
when what happens is very different than what might be expected; or when things seem incongruous together — especially when amusing or an entertaining coincidence
Word Statistics
Book1 uses
Library8 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 16
Web Links
2  —1 use as in:
verbal irony
She pronounced the "we" with a faint emphasis that gave it an ironic sound.
ironic = saying one thing while meaning another
DefinitionGenerally this sense of irony means:
saying or writing one thing, while meaning the opposite or something else — usually as humor or sarcasm
Word Statistics
Book1 uses
Library8 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 18
Web Links
obscure   (3 meanings)
3 meanings, 13 uses
1  —6 uses as in:
the view or directions are obscure
For a couple of hours Archer had examined the terms of the deed with his senior, all the while obscurely feeling that if he had been consulted it was for some reason other than the obvious one of his cousinship; and that the close of the conference would reveal it.
obscurely = in a manner not clearly understood
DefinitionGenerally this sense of obscure means:
not clearly seen, understood, or expressed
Word Statistics
Book6 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
SATtop 2000
1st useChapter 9
Web Links
2  —5 uses as in:
knows the famous and the obscure
Only the older people remembered so obscure an incident in the business life of New York as Beaufort's failure, or the fact that after his wife's death he had been quietly married to the notorious Fanny Ring, and had left the country with his new wife, and a little girl who inherited her beauty.
obscure = not known to many people
DefinitionGenerally this sense of obscure means:
not known to many people; or unimportant or undistinguished
Word Statistics
Book5 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
SATtop 2000
1st useChapter 6
Web Links
3  —2 uses as in:
was obscure, but now bright
As it drove off she leaned forward, and he thought she waved her hand in the obscurity.
obscurity = darkness
DefinitionGenerally this sense of obscure means:
dark or dingy; or inconspicuous (not very noticeable)
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 31
Web Links
opera
43 uses
No expense had been spared on the setting, which was acknowledged to be very beautiful even by people who shared his acquaintance with the Opera houses of Paris and Vienna.
opera = (built for) classical music plays in which most of the dialogue is sung
DefinitionGenerally opera means:
a musical play with orchestra in which most dialogue is sung — (typically associated with classical music and often in a language foreign to the audience)

or:

the art form (or describing something as related to it) that consists of musical plays with orchestra in which most dialogue is sung
Word Statistics
Book43 uses
Library8 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1
Web Links
philanthropy
3 uses
The melancholy possibility of having to "kill time" (especially for those who did not care for whist or solitaire) was a vision that haunted her as the specter of the unemployed haunts the philanthropist.
philanthropist = someone who helps others — especially by donating money to worthy causes
DefinitionGenerally philanthropy means:
helping others — especially donating money to worthy causes; or an organization that does so
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library1 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 22
Web Links
repudiate
1 use
And then, as Archer made no effort to glance at the paper or to repudiate the suggestion, the lawyer somewhat flatly continued:
repudiate = reject
DefinitionGenerally repudiate means:
strong rejection — especially when the idea or thing being rejected was once embraced
Word Statistics
Book1 uses
Library1 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 33
Web Links
resignation
4 uses
1  —4 uses as in:
accepted it with resignation
To have to make this fact plain to her—and to witness her resigned acceptance of it—had been intolerably painful to him.
resigned = accepted something undesired as unavoidable or the lesser of evils
DefinitionGenerally this sense of resignation means:
acceptance of something undesired as unavoidable or the lesser of evils
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library9 uses in 10 avg bks
SATtop 1000
1st useChapter 7
Web Links
venerate
1 use
Professor Emerson Sillerton was a thorn in the side of Newport society; and a thorn that could not be plucked out, for it grew on a ... venerated family tree.
venerated = regarded with feelings of respect and reverence
DefinitionGenerally venerate means:
regard with feelings of respect and reverence
Word Statistics
Book1 uses
Library1 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 22
Web Links
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