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The Age of Innocence
Vocabulary

Extra Credit Words with Sample Sentences from the Book

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abrupt
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
an abrupt change
"Well—upon my soul!" exclaimed Lawrence Lefferts, turning his opera-glass abruptly away from the stage.
abruptly = suddenly
DefinitionGenerally this sense of abrupt means:
sudden and unexpected
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library15 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1
Web Links
apathy
1 use
the writing of occasional articles in one of the reforming weeklies that were trying to shake the country out of its apathy.
apathy = lack of interest and enthusiasm
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 34
Web Links
benevolent
3 uses
Mrs. van der Luyden shone on her with the dim benevolence which was her nearest approach to cordiality,
benevolence = kindness and generosity

(editor's note:  cordiality implies a warmth that, often accompanies the missing word, but in this case does not.)
DefinitionGenerally benevolent means:
kind, generous, or charitable
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 7
Web Links
capricious
1 use
he judged her to be capricious, and easily wearied of the pleasure of the moment.
capricious = impulsive or unpredictable
DefinitionGenerally capricious means:
impulsive or unpredictable or tending to make sudden changes — especially impulsive behavior
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 14
Web Links
conciliatory
2 uses
"Madame Olenska is a great favourite with the gentlemen," said Miss Sophy, with her air of wishing to put forth something conciliatory when she knew that she was planting a dart.
conciliatory = intended to end bad feelings or build trust
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 4
Web Links
disdain
1 use
Their own compatriots—save those previously known or properly accredited—they treated with an even more pronounced disdain; so that, unless they ran across a Chivers, a Dagonet or a Mingott, their months abroad were spent in an unbroken tete-a-tete.
disdain = a lack of respect
DefinitionGenerally disdain means:
a lack of respect — often suggesting distaste and an undeserved sense of superiority

or:

to reject as not good enough
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library8 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 20
Web Links
eccentric
3 uses
We must always bear in mind what an eccentric bringing-up Medora Manson gave her.
eccentric = unconventional or strange
DefinitionGenerally eccentric means:
unconventional or strange; or a person with such traits
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 8
Web Links
establish
4 uses
1  —4 uses as in:
establish a positive tone
In obedience to a long-established habit, the Wellands had left the previous week for St. Augustine, where, out of regard for the supposed susceptibility of Mr. Welland's bronchial tubes, they always spent the latter part of the winter.†
established = set in place
DefinitionGenerally this sense of establish means:
create, start, or set in [a] place
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library22 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 4
Web Links
guile
3 uses
Untrained human nature was not frank and innocent; it was full of the twists and defences of an instinctive guile.
guile = cunning (shrewd, clever) and deceitful
DefinitionGenerally guile means:
cunning (shrewdness and cleverness) and deceitful
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1
Web Links
hackneyed
2 uses
it was hateful to find himself the prisoner of this hackneyed vocabulary.
hackneyed = unimaginative and filled with overused expressions
DefinitionGenerally hackneyed means:
lacking impact due to too much previous exposure — especially writing that is unimaginative and filled with overused expressions, ideas, and formulas
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 13
Web Links
incredulous
3 uses
Archer looked at her incredulously.
incredulously = with disbelief
DefinitionGenerally incredulous means:
unbelieving; or having difficulty accepting something so unexpected
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library11 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 8
Web Links
indifferent
21 uses
"...it doesn't matter," said Mrs. Archer indifferently.
indifferently = without interest
DefinitionGenerally indifferent means:
without interest
in various senses, including:
  • unconcerned — as in "She is indifferent to what is served to eat."
  • unsympathetic — as in "She is indifferent to his needs."
  • not of good quality (which may imply average or poor quality depending upon context) — as in "an indifferent performance"
  • impartial — as in "We need a judge who is indifferent."
Word Statistics
Book21 uses
Library19 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 5
Web Links
indolent
2 uses
She was indolent, passive, the caustic even called her dull
indolent = lazy
DefinitionGenerally this sense of indolent means:
lazy; disinclined to work
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 3
Web Links
ostentatious
1 use
She made way for him by pushing back her chair, and promptly, and a little ostentatiously, with the desire that the whole house should see what he was doing, Archer seated himself at the Countess Olenska's side.
ostentatiously = in a manner intended to attract notice and impress others
DefinitionGenerally ostentatious means:
intended to attract notice and impress others — especially with wealth in a vulgar way
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2
Web Links
prudent
3 uses
Better keep on the surface, in the prudent old New York way, than risk uncovering a wound he could not heal.
prudent = sensible and careful
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library7 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 21
Web Links
resignation
4 uses
1  —4 uses as in:
accepted it with resignation
To have to make this fact plain to her—and to witness her resigned acceptance of it—had been intolerably painful to him.
resigned = accepted something undesired as unavoidable or the lesser of evils
DefinitionGenerally this sense of resignation means:
acceptance of something undesired as unavoidable or the lesser of evils
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library11 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 7
Web Links
reticent
1 use
He thought the adieux of Montague and Ada Dyas as fine as anything he had ever seen Croisette and Bressant do in Paris, or Madge Robertson and Kendal in London; in its reticence, its dumb sorrow, it moved him more than the most famous histrionic outpourings.
reticence = reluctance
DefinitionGenerally reticent means:
reluctant — especially to speak freely
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 13
Web Links
revere
5 uses
Mother and daughter adored each other and revered their son and brother
revered = deeply admire and respect
DefinitionGenerally revere means:
regard with feelings of deep respect and admiration — sometimes with a mixture of wonder and awe or fear
Word Statistics
Book5 uses
Library12 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 2
Web Links
scrutiny
3 uses
Archer paused again, and their eyes met in another protracted scrutiny.
scrutiny = inspection
DefinitionGenerally scrutiny means:
careful examination of something
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library10 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 13
Web Links
summon
16 uses
It was evident that he had been summoned rather for the moral support of the stricken ladies than because of any specific aid that he could render.
summoned = called (asked to come)
DefinitionGenerally summon means:
to call forth
The exact meaning of summon can depend upon its context. For example:
  • "summon to court" — officially demand that someone appear in court (call them to court)
  • "summon the team to a meeting" — call upon the team members to attend a meeting
  • "summon help" — call others to come and help
  • "summon her courage" — call forth her courage from within
Word Statistics
Book16 uses
Library29 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 9
Web Links
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