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vocabulary
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Washington Square
Vocabulary

Extra Credit Words with Sample Sentences from the Book

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aesthetic
1 use
To visit one's lover, with tears and reproaches, at his own residence, was an image so agreeable to Mrs. Penniman's mind that she felt a sort of aesthetic disappointment at its lacking, in this case, the harmonious accompaniments of darkness and storm.
aesthetic = related to beauty (in this case, the beauty of a situation completely as one might imagine it)
DefinitionGenerally aesthetic means:
related to beauty or good taste — often referring to one's appreciation of beauty or one's sense of what is beautiful

or:

beautiful or tasteful
Word Statistics
Book1 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
SATtop 2000
1st useChapter 30
Web Links
agitate
8 uses
Catherine was always agitated by an introduction;
agitated = emotionally stirred up (probably made anxious)
DefinitionGenerally agitate means:
to stir up — emotionally (such as anxiety) or physically (such as shaking)
Word Statistics
Book8 uses
Library15 uses in 10 avg bks
SATtop 500
1st useChapter 7
Web Links
apparent
10 uses
Catherine came and opened it; she was apparently very quiet.
apparently = obviously
DefinitionGenerally apparent means:
clear or obvious; or appearing as such but not necessarily so
Word Statistics
Book10 uses
Library50 uses in 10 avg bks
SATtop 500
1st useChapter 14
Web Links
benevolent
1 use
a benevolent attempt to confer a distinction upon a young woman
benevolent = kind
DefinitionGenerally benevolent means:
kind, generous, or charitable
Word Statistics
Book1 uses
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 15
Web Links
candid
1 use
As regards this, however, a critical attitude would be inconsistent with a candid reference to the early annals of any biographer.
candid = honest and direct
Word Statistics
Book1 uses
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
SATtop 500
1st useChapter 2
Web Links
capricious
1 use
It is the first time I have been told I am capricious.
capricious = impulsive or unpredictable
DefinitionGenerally capricious means:
impulsive or unpredictable or tending to make sudden changes — especially impulsive behavior
Word Statistics
Book1 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 25
Web Links
censure
1 use
He walked under the weight of this very private censure for the rest of his days
censure = harsh criticism
DefinitionGenerally censure means:
harsh criticism; or formal criticism from an organization — such as the U.S. Senate
Word Statistics
Book1 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1
Web Links
deride
1 use
Morris had swallowed his pride and made the effort necessary to cross the threshold of her too derisive parent
derisive = treating him as inferior and unworthy of respect
DefinitionGenerally deride means:
laugh at or make fun of—while showing a lack of respect
Word Statistics
Book1 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 10
Web Links
dissent
1 use
From this assertion Mrs. Penniman saw no reason to dissent
dissent = disagree
DefinitionGenerally dissent means:
to disagree; or disagreement or conflict — typically between people who cooperate, and often with official or majority beliefs
Word Statistics
Book1 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2
Web Links
earnest
9 uses
Is he in earnest about Catherine, then?
earnest = an honest and sincere state of mind
DefinitionGenerally earnest means:
characterized by sincere belief

or:

intensely or excessively serious
Word Statistics
Book9 uses
Library19 uses in 10 avg bks
SATtop 1000
1st useChapter 11
Web Links
expedient
1 use
She wondered that this simple expedient had never occurred to her before.
expedient = an action that is speedy or practical
DefinitionGenerally expedient means:
a practical action — especially one that accepts negative tradeoffs due to circumstances

or:

convenient, speedy, or practical
Word Statistics
Book1 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 28
Web Links
harbinger
1 use
I am afraid I am not altogether a harbinger of good; and yet, too, I am to a certain extent a messenger of peace.
harbinger = an indication of the approach of something
DefinitionGenerally harbinger means:
an indication of the approach of something — especially something bad
Word Statistics
Book1 uses
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 21
Web Links
incredulous
1 use
"I don't see why you should be incredulous," said Mrs. Almond.
incredulous = not believing
DefinitionGenerally incredulous means:
unbelieving; or having difficulty accepting something so unexpected
Word Statistics
Book1 uses
Library10 uses in 10 avg bks
SATtop 1000
1st useChapter 6
Web Links
indifferent
4 uses
I have not been in the least indifferent.
indifferent = without interest
DefinitionGenerally indifferent means:
without interest — in various senses such as:
  • unconcerned
  • unsympathetic
  • impartial
  • not of good quality (which may imply average or poor quality depending upon context)
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library18 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 22
Web Links
inquire
14 uses
"My dear Austin," she then inquired, "do you think it is better to be clever than to be good?"
inquired = asked
DefinitionGenerally inquire means:
to ask about or look into something
Word Statistics
Book14 uses
Library20 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2
Web Links
minuteness
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
minute size; or minute description
He told her which of his fellow physicians to send for, and gave her a multitude of minute directions; it was quite on the optimistic hypothesis that she nursed him.
minute = very small

or:

detailed (including even small considerations)
Word Statistics
Book1 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 33
Web Links
mitigate
2 uses
Even at the age of twenty- seven Austin Sloper had made his mark sufficiently to mitigate the anomaly of his having been chosen among a dozen suitors by a young woman of high fashion, who had ten thousand dollars of income and the most charming eyes in the island of Manhattan.
mitigate = make less harmful or unpleasant
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
SATtop 1000
1st useChapter 1
Web Links
prudent
2 uses
Prudence before everything.
prudence = good sense and caution
DefinitionGenerally prudent means:
sensible and careful
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library7 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 21
Web Links
reticent
1 use
a good deal of mysterious reticence on Mrs. Penniman's part.
reticence = reluctance to speak freely
DefinitionGenerally reticent means:
reluctant — especially to speak freely
Word Statistics
Book1 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 31
Web Links
zeal
3 uses
he did his duty with exemplary zeal
zeal = active interest and enthusiasm
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2
Web Links
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