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Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde
Vocabulary

Extra Credit Words with Sample Sentences from the Book

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depravity
1 use
When I would come back from these excursions, I was often plunged into a kind of wonder at my vicarious depravity.
depravity = immorality

(editor's note:  Vicarious means experienced secondhand, so the last three words could be paraphrased as "my enjoyment at having seen such immoral behavior.")
DefinitionGenerally depravity means:
complete immorality or evilness
Word Statistics
Book1 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 10
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deride
1 use
And now, you who have so long been bound to the most narrow and material views, you who have denied the virtue of transcendental medicine, you who have derided your superiors— behold!
derided = laughed at or made fun of—while showing a lack of respect
DefinitionGenerally deride means:
laugh at or make fun of—while showing a lack of respect
Word Statistics
Book1 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 9
Web Links
despondent
1 use
His terror of the gallows drove him continually to commit temporary suicide, and return to his subordinate station of a part instead of a person; but he loathed the necessity, he loathed the despondency into which Jekyll was now fallen, and he resented the dislike with which he was himself regarded.
despondency = depression
DefinitionGenerally despondent means:
emotionally depressed — especially a feeling of grief and hopelessness after a loss
Word Statistics
Book1 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 10
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duplicity
1 use
when I reached years of reflection, and began to look round me and take stock of my progress and position in the world, I stood already committed to a profound duplicity of life.
duplicity = deception — such as lying
DefinitionGenerally duplicity means:
deception (lying to or misleading others) — usually over an extended period
Word Statistics
Book1 uses
Library1 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 10
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eccentric
1 use
The first was a will, drawn in the same eccentric terms as the one which he had returned six months before,
eccentric = unconventional or strange
DefinitionGenerally eccentric means:
unconventional or strange; or a person with such traits
Word Statistics
Book1 uses
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 8
Web Links
enigma
1 use
you speak enigmas
enigmas = things that are mysterious and seem unexplainable
DefinitionGenerally enigma means:
something mysterious that seems unexplainable
Word Statistics
Book1 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 9
Web Links
extraneous
1 use
If each, I told myself, could but be housed in separate identities, life would be relieved of all that was unbearable; the unjust delivered from the aspirations might go his way, and remorse of his more upright twin; and the just could walk steadfastly and securely on his upward path, doing the good things in which he found his pleasure, and no longer exposed to disgrace and penitence by the hands of this extraneous evil.
extraneous = not belonging to that in which it is contained

(editor's note:  This is a less common sense of extraneous. More frequently, it means "not pertinent to the matter under consideration".)
DefinitionGenerally extraneous means:
not relevant or important to the matter under consideration
Word Statistics
Book1 uses
Library1 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 10
Web Links
florid
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
a florid style
Even on Sunday, when it veiled its more florid charms and lay comparatively empty of passage, the street shone out in contrast to its dingy neighbourhood, like a fire in a forest; and with its freshly painted shutters, well-polished brasses, and general cleanliness and gaiety of note, instantly caught and pleased the eye of the passenger.
florid = elaborate (decorative details)
DefinitionGenerally this sense of florid means:
elaborate (with much decorative detail)
Word Statistics
Book1 uses
Library1 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1
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gesticulate
1 use
This was the shocking thing; that the slime of the pit seemed to utter cries and voices; that the amorphous dust gesticulated and sinned; that what was dead, and had no shape, should usurp the offices of life.
gesticulated = made body movements
DefinitionGenerally gesticulate means:
to make gestures (hand or body movements) while speaking or to express something
Word Statistics
Book1 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 10
Web Links
indifferent
3 uses
Hyde was indifferent to Jekyll, or but remembered him as the mountain bandit remembers the cavern in which he conceals himself from pursuit.
indifferent = without interest
DefinitionGenerally indifferent means:
without interest — in various senses such as:
  • unconcerned
  • unsympathetic
  • impartial
  • not of good quality (which may imply average or poor quality depending upon context)
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library18 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 5
Web Links
inquire
7 uses
he inquired suddenly.
inquired = asked about or looked into
DefinitionGenerally inquire means:
to ask about or look into something
Word Statistics
Book7 uses
Library20 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 4
Web Links
insidious
1 use
Henry Jekyll stood at times aghast before the acts of Edward Hyde; but the situation was apart from ordinary laws, and insidiously relaxed the grasp of conscience.
insidiously = in a dangerous, tricky manner
DefinitionGenerally insidious means:
not appearing dangerous, but actually very harmful over time

or:

treacherous  (dangerous due to trickery or from hidden or unpredictable risks)
Word Statistics
Book1 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 10
Web Links
obsequious
1 use
At the inn, as I entered, I looked about me with so black a countenance as made the attendants tremble; not a look did they exchange in my presence; but obsequiously took my orders, led me to a private room, and brought me wherewithal to write.
obsequiously = in a manner that is excessively eager to flatter or serve
DefinitionGenerally obsequious means:
excessively eager to flatter or serve
Word Statistics
Book1 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 10
Web Links
pedantic
4 uses
But I have been pedantically exact, as you call it.
pedantically = with too much concern for details or book learning
DefinitionGenerally pedantic means:
too concerned with formal rules, details, or book learning
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library1 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1
Web Links
poignant
1 use
and beyond these links of community, which in themselves made the most poignant part of his distress, he thought of Hyde, for all his energy of life, as of something not only hellish but inorganic.
poignant = profoundly touching the emotions —  especially sadness or pity
Word Statistics
Book1 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 10
Web Links
reprove
1 use
But he had an approved tolerance for others; sometimes wondering, almost with envy, at the high pressure of spirits involved in their misdeeds; and in any extremity inclined to help rather than to reprove.
reprove = express disapproval
DefinitionGenerally reprove means:
to express disapproval of one's actions to them
Word Statistics
Book1 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1
Web Links
resolute
1 use
Yes, I preferred the elderly and discontented doctor, surrounded by friends and cherishing honest hopes; and bade a resolute farewell to the liberty, the comparative youth, the light step, leaping impulses and secret pleasures, that I had enjoyed in the disguise of Hyde.
resolute = firm in purpose or belief
Word Statistics
Book1 uses
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 10
Web Links
scrupulous
1 use
I took and furnished that house in Soho, to which Hyde was tracked by the police; and engaged as housekeeper a creature whom I well knew to be silent and unscrupulous.
unscrupulous = not moral
DefinitionGenerally scrupulous means:
careful to behave ethically and/or diligently (with great care and attention to detail)
Word Statistics
Book1 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 10
Web Links
solemn
5 uses
"Why don't you read it, sir?" asked Poole.
"Because I fear," replied the lawyer solemnly. "God grant I have no cause for it!" And with that he brought the paper to his eyes and read as follows:
solemnly = with seriousness
DefinitionGenerally solemn means:
very serious—and often dignified
Word Statistics
Book5 uses
Library21 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 5
Web Links
usurp
1 use
This was the shocking thing; that the slime of the pit seemed to utter cries and voices; that the amorphous dust gesticulated and sinned; that what was dead, and had no shape, should usurp the offices of life.
usurp = seize or take control without authority
Word Statistics
Book1 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 10
Web Links
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