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Nicholas Nickleby
Vocabulary

Top-Ranked Words with Typical Sample Sentences

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approach   (2 meanings)
2 meanings, 5 uses
1  —3 uses as in:
approached the city
Winter is approaching.
approaching = getting nearer
DefinitionGenerally this sense of approach means:
to get closer to
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library88 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 9
Web Links
2  —2 uses as in:
approached her with the proposal
They approached her about becoming a member of the committee.
approached = began speaking with someone about something
DefinitionGenerally this sense of approach means:
to begin communication with someone about something — often a proposal or a delicate topic
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
1st usePref.
Web Links
complacent
17 uses
He had become complacent after years of success.
complacent = contented (unworried and satisfied) — often to a fault
Word Statistics
Book17 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 18
Web Links
consequence   (2 meanings)
2 meanings, 66 uses
1  —56 uses as in:
a direct consequence of
Your decision will have three major consequences.
consequences = results
DefinitionGenerally this sense of consequence means:
a result of something (often an undesired side effect)
Word Statistics
Book56 uses
Library25 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 10
Web Links
2  —10 uses as in:
of little consequence
Think carefully. This is a consequential decision.
consequential = important
DefinitionGenerally this sense of consequence means:
importance or relevance
Word Statistics
Book10 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 8
Web Links
countenance   (2 meanings)
2 meanings, 3 uses
1  —1 use as in:
a pleasant countenance
She has a pleasant countenance.
countenance = facial expression; or face
DefinitionGenerally this sense of countenance means:
facial expression; or face; or composure
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 28
Web Links
2  —2 uses as in:
giving countenance
We will not countenance torture.
countenance = to tolerate or approve
DefinitionGenerally this sense of countenance means:
to tolerate, approve, or show favor or support
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 46
Web Links
credulous
2 uses
The trick would fool none but the most credulous.
credulous = gullible (being too willing to believe)
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 59
Web Links
engender
2 uses
The police in Mexico don't engender confidence.
engender = cause
DefinitionGenerally engender means:
cause — usually a feeling (possibly a situation)
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2
Web Links
establish   (2 meanings)
2 meanings, 12 uses
1  —10 uses as in:
establish a positive tone
Which word choice best maintains the tone established in the first paragraph?
established = created
DefinitionGenerally this sense of establish means:
create, start, or set in [a] place
Word Statistics
Book10 uses
Library21 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 43
Web Links
2  —2 uses as in:
establish that there is a need
The passage is primarily about establishing the relationship between the level of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere and global temperature.
establishing = showing or demonstrating
DefinitionGenerally this sense of establish means:
show or determine (cause to be recognized or figure out)
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 30
Web Links
impetuous
6 uses
She regretted her impetuous promise.
impetuous = impulsive (made suddenly without much thought)
DefinitionGenerally this sense of impetuous means:
impulsive (acting suddenly without much thought) — often with an unfortunate consequence
Word Statistics
Book6 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 54
Web Links
obscure
7 uses
1  —4 uses as in:
it obscured my view
The stars are obscured by the clouds.
obscured = hidden or made less visible
DefinitionGenerally this sense of obscure means:
to block from view or make less visible or understandable
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 52
Web Links
unquizzed meaning  —3 uses
passage
1 use
Each passage below is followed by a number of questions.
passage = a short part of a longer written work
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 29
Web Links
phenomenon
51 uses
It is a growing social phenomenon on high school campuses.
phenomenon = something that can be seen and is of special interest
DefinitionGenerally phenomenon means:
something that exists or happened — especially something of special interest — sometimes someone or something that is extraordinary
Word Statistics
Book51 uses
Library7 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 25
Web Links
remonstrate
28 uses
When she has a complaint with her staff, she will remonstrate quietly and in private.
remonstrate = argue in protest or opposition
Word Statistics
Book28 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 35
Web Links
render   (3 meanings)
3 meanings, 3 uses
1  —1 use as in:
rendered service or a verdict
We're waiting for the jury to render a verdict.
render = give
DefinitionGenerally this sense of render means:
to give or supply something
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 61
Web Links
2  —1 use as in:
rendered her unconscious
Her verbal attack rendered me speechless.
rendered = made (caused to become)
DefinitionGenerally this sense of render means:
to make or cause to become
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 60
Web Links
3  —1 use as in:
rendered with, or rendered from
The pianist rendered the Beethoven sonata beautifully.
rendered = played (portrayed or gave her interpretation of)
DefinitionGenerally this sense of render means:
to portray or create something in a particular way; or to interpret, translate, or extract from
The exact meaning of this sense of render depends upon its context. For example:
  • "Each artist will render a different interpretation when painting a portrait." — create in a particular way
  • "A Supreme Court judge may render his own interpretation of the Constitution." — interpret in a particular way
  • "The computer you are using, rendered this page from software instructions." — created through interpretation
  • "A graph is rendered from the underlying data." — made
  • "Fat can be rendered (extracted) by cooking meat slowly." — extracted from
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 54
Web Links
retort
82 uses
She wanted to retort that he that he sounded more foolish than he looked, but she made herself count to ten and thought better of it.
retort = quickly reply
DefinitionGenerally this sense of retort means:
a quick reply to a question or remark — especially a witty or critical one
Word Statistics
Book82 uses
Library7 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 3
Web Links
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