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Dubliners
Vocabulary

Extra Credit Words with Sample Sentences from the Book

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abstract
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
abstract thought
She respected her husband in the same way as she respected the General Post Office, as something large, secure and fixed; and though she knew the small number of his talents she appreciated his abstract value as a male.
abstract = of a concept or idea not associated with any specific instance

(editor's note:  This book also uses abstracted twice in a sense that is seldom seen outside of classic literature. In that sense it means "lost in thought" or "made to be lost in thought". Here is one of the examples from this book: "His imagination had so abstracted him that his name was called twice before he answered.")
DefinitionGenerally this sense of abstract means:
of a concept or idea not associated with any specific instance

or more rarely:

describing someone as distracted — thinking about something outside of the immediate conversation or circumstances
Word Statistics
Book1 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
SATtop 500
1st useChapter 13
Web Links
decorum
1 use
Even he was sensible of the decorous atmosphere and even he began to respond to the religious stimulus.
decorous = manners and conduct considered to be proper and in good taste
Word Statistics
Book1 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 14
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deride
1 use
Gazing up into the darkness I saw myself as a creature driven and derided by vanity; and my eyes burned with anguish and anger.
derided = laughed at or made fun of
DefinitionGenerally deride means:
laugh at or make fun of—while showing a lack of respect
Word Statistics
Book1 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 3
Web Links
ebullient
1 use
He was extremely nervous and extremely jealous of other tenors and he covered his nervous jealousy with an ebullient friendliness.
ebullient = joyously unrestrained
Word Statistics
Book1 uses
Library1 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 13
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efface
1 use
The little woman hoped they would have a good house. She looked out at the rain until the melancholy of the wet street effaced all the trustfulness and enthusiasm from her twisted features. Then she gave a little sigh and said:
"Ah, well! We did our best, the dear knows."
effaced = remove completely

(editor's note:  In this context, good house means large audience. Melancholy is a synonym for sadness.)
DefinitionGenerally efface means:
remove completely from recognition or memory — sometimes by erasing

or:

to make oneself inconspicuous or unimportant
Word Statistics
Book1 uses
Library1 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 13
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exemplar
1 use
He designed to give them a word of counsel, setting before them as exemplars in the religious life those very worshippers of...
exemplars = examples — especially those represents the ideal
DefinitionGenerally exemplar means:
an example — especially one that represents the ideal
Word Statistics
Book1 uses
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
SATtop 2000
1st useChapter 14
Web Links
florid
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
florid color
She stood up and surveyed herself in the pier-glass. The decisive expression of her great florid face satisfied her and...
florid = a reddish color

(editor's note:  Pier-glass is a synonym for mirror.)
DefinitionGenerally this sense of florid means:
a reddish color — (especially about someone's complexion or in various medical contexts)
Word Statistics
Book1 uses
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 7
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garrulous
1 use
She was an old garrulous woman,
garrulous = talkative
DefinitionGenerally garrulous means:
talkative — especially about trivial matters
Word Statistics
Book1 uses
Library1 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 3
Web Links
haughty
1 use
She tossed her head and assumed a haughty voice: "You must speak to the secretary."
haughty = arrogant or condescending (acting superior or self-important)
Word Statistics
Book1 uses
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 13
Web Links
impetuous
1 use
Perhaps she had felt the impetuous desire that was in him, and then the yielding mood had come upon her.
impetuous = impulsive (acting suddenly without much thought)
DefinitionGenerally this sense of impetuous means:
impulsive (acting suddenly without much thought) — often with an unfortunate consequence
Word Statistics
Book1 uses
Library1 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 15
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morose
1 use
Though his eyes took note of many elements of the crowd through which he passed they did so morosely. He found trivial all that was meant to charm him and did not answer the glances which invited him to be bold. He knew that he would have to speak a great deal, to invent and to amuse and his brain and throat were too dry for such a task.
morosely = unhappily — often with a withdrawn personality
DefinitionGenerally morose means:
unhappy — often with a withdrawn personality
Word Statistics
Book1 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 6
Web Links
obsequious
1 use
The proprietor served him obsequiously but did not venture to talk.
obsequiously = in a manner that is excessively eager to flatter or serve
DefinitionGenerally obsequious means:
excessively eager to flatter or serve
Word Statistics
Book1 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 11
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obstinate
1 use
Beyond the river he saw a goods train winding out of Kingsbridge Station, like a worm with a fiery head winding through the darkness, obstinately and laboriously.
obstinately = stubbornly (unyielding)
DefinitionGenerally obstinate means:
stubbornly not doing what others want
Word Statistics
Book1 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 11
Web Links
opulent
1 use
they brought a breath of opulence among the company.
opulence = magnificence or luxury
DefinitionGenerally opulent means:
magnificent and luxurious — usually expensive
Word Statistics
Book1 uses
Library1 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 13
Web Links
orthodox
1 use
Only sometimes, they say, he didn't preach what was quite orthodox.
orthodox = what is commonly accepted
DefinitionGenerally orthodox means:
thinking and behavior that is (or was) commonly accepted
Word Statistics
Book1 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 14
Web Links
penitent
1 use
He ran as if to bring me aid. And I was penitent; for in my heart I had always despised him a little.
penitent = feeling sorrow for having done wrong
DefinitionGenerally penitent means:
feeling or expressing sorrow for having done wrong; or a person who does such
Word Statistics
Book1 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2
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remonstrate
1 use
His father, remonstrative, but covertly proud of the excess, had paid his bills and brought him home.
remonstrative = expressed disapproval

(editor's note:  Covertly is a synonym for secretly.)
DefinitionGenerally remonstrate means:
argue in protest or opposition
Word Statistics
Book1 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 5
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scrupulous
1 use
"He was too scrupulous always," she said.
scrupulous = careful to behave ethically and/or diligently
DefinitionGenerally scrupulous means:
careful to behave ethically and/or diligently (with great care and attention to detail)
Word Statistics
Book1 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1
Web Links
servile
1 use
A shade of mockery relieved the servility of his manner.
...
"There's nothing to touch a good slavey," he affirmed.
servility = submissiveness
DefinitionGenerally servile means:
submissive — typically excessively so (so submissive or eager to serve and please that one seems to have no self-respect)

or:

relating to the work that requires obeying demeaning commands

or:

slave-like or relating to slaves
Word Statistics
Book1 uses
Library1 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 6
Web Links
timorous
1 use
He told her that for some time he had assisted at the meetings of an Irish Socialist Party where.... The workmen's discussions, he said, were too timorous;
timorous = timid (fearful)
DefinitionGenerally timorous means:
timid (fearful) or shy
Word Statistics
Book1 uses
Library1 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 11
Web Links
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