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The Merchant of Venice
Vocabulary

Extra Credit Words with Typical Sample Sentences

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abject
1 use
She grew up in abject poverty; though she didn't know it.
abject = extreme
DefinitionGenerally abject means:
extreme (in a negative sense such as misery, hopelessness, submissiveness, cruelty, or cowardice)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useScene 4.1
Web Links
attribute
2 uses
1  —2 uses as in:
It is an attribute of...
The spreadsheet has a column to describe the breed of dog and then ten additional columns to indicate attributes of the breeds. For example the second column has the average full-grown weight.
attributes = characteristics
DefinitionGenerally this sense of attribute means:
a characteristic (of something or someone)
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useScene 4.1
Web Links
bestow
4 uses
They gave her the highest honor they can bestow.
bestow = give (as an honor)
DefinitionGenerally bestow means:
to give — typically to present as an honor or give as a gift
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library7 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useScene 2.2
Web Links
eloquent
1 use
Her eloquence is unquestioned even amongst those who disagree with her.
eloquence = the powerful use of language
DefinitionGenerally eloquent means:
powerful use of language
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library7 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useScene 3.2
Web Links
exeunt
26 uses
Exeunt all except Hamlet.
exeunt = stage direction:  characters exit from stage
Word Statistics
Book26 uses
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useScene 1.1
Web Links
exhort
1 use
I have exhorted and encouraged her, but it has to be her decision.
exhorted = urged strongly
DefinitionGenerally exhort means:
to urge strongly
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useScene 1.1
Web Links
fulsome
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
a fulsome fund for emergencies
Our government is good at spending more when the economy is troubled, but does not save during fulsome times.
fulsome = abundant

(editor's note:  this sense of the word is frequently used in historic literature, but today the word is more commonly used to describe compliments or praise as excessive—often implying insincerity.)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useScene 1.3
Web Links
impugn
1 use
She impugns the statistics even though they are validated at factcheck.com.
impugns = attacks as false or wrong
DefinitionGenerally impugn means:
attack as false or wrong
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useScene 4.1
Web Links
impute
1 use
Her critics impute a more cynical motive.
impute = attribute (say something is caused by)
DefinitionGenerally this sense of impute means:
attribute (to say one thing is the cause of another—often to blame and often wrongly)

or:

believe something to have a characteristic; or assign a value to something
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useScene 1.3
Web Links
knell
1 use
The poll should be interpreted as the death knell of her campaign.
knell = the sound of a bell rung slowly — especially to announce death or a funeral
DefinitionGenerally knell means:
the sound of a bell rung slowly — especially to announce death or a funeral

or:

announcing the demise or end of something
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useScene 3.2
Web Links
mercenary
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
a mercenary attitude
She has mercenary motives.
mercenary = marked by materialism or a profit orientation
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useScene 4.1
Web Links
mirth
2 uses
It was an evening of many stories and great mirth.
mirth = fun and laughter
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useScene 1.1
Web Links
mitigate
1 use
Don't judge her so harshly until you consider the mitigating circumstances.
mitigating = making less harmful or unpleasant
DefinitionGenerally mitigate means:
make less harmful or unpleasant
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useScene 4.1
Web Links
obdurate
1 use
Some of the protestors disbanded when the police arrived, but others remained obdurate.
obdurate = stubbornly persistent
DefinitionGenerally obdurate means:
stubbornly persistent — especially in wrongdoing

or more rarely (except in classic literature):

showing unfeeling resistance to tender feelings
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useScene 4.1
Web Links
obscure   (2 meanings)
2 meanings, 2 uses
1  —1 use as in:
it obscured my view
The stars are obscured by the clouds.
obscured = hidden or made less visible
DefinitionGenerally this sense of obscure means:
to block from view or make less visible or understandable
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useScene 3.2
Web Links
2  —1 use as in:
was obscure, but now bright
The once shiny silver was now tarnished and obscure.
obscure = dark, dingy, or inconspicuous
DefinitionGenerally this sense of obscure means:
dark or dingy; or inconspicuous (not very noticeable)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useScene 2.7
Web Links
perjury
1 use
She was not found guilty of the theft, but was found guilty of perjury during her testimony to the grand jury.
perjury = the criminal offense of telling lies in court after formally promising to tell the truth
DefinitionGenerally perjury means:
the criminal offense of telling lies after formally promising to tell the truth — such as when testifying in a court trial
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useScene 4.1
Web Links
repentance
4 uses
Prisoners who show repentance are more likely to be released on parole.
repentance = regret for having done wrong with a desire to be a better person in the future
DefinitionGenerally repentance means:
the feeling or expression of regret for having done something wrong with a firm decision to be a better person in the future
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useScene 4.1
Web Links
tedious
3 uses
I'll have to endure one of her tedious lectures.
tedious = boring or monotonous
DefinitionGenerally tedious means:
boring — especially because something goes on too long or without variation
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useScene 2.3
Web Links
temporal
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
temporal world
She focuses more on the spiritual while his main concern is with temporal existence.
temporal = concerned with the material (in contrast to the spiritual) world
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useScene 4.1
Web Links
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