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vocabulary
1000+ books

Sense and Sensibility
Vocabulary

Extra Credit Words with Typical Sample Sentences

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abstruse
1 use
The professor's lectures were so abstruse that students tended to avoid them.
abstruse = difficult to understand
DefinitionGenerally abstruse means:
difficult to understand; or not known by the great majority of people
Word Statistics
Book1 uses
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 19
Web Links
amiable
18 uses
She seemed an ideal candidate—attractive, amiable, intelligent and energetic.
amiable = friendly and kindly
Word Statistics
Book18 uses
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1
Web Links
benevolent
4 uses
They called themselves The Benevolent Association because their mission was to help others.
benevolent = kind, generous, or charitable
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 37
Web Links
censure
14 uses
They censured him for bringing dishonor upon the Senate.
censured = formally criticized
DefinitionGenerally censure means:
harsh criticism; or formal criticism from an organization — such as the U.S. Senate
Word Statistics
Book14 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 18
Web Links
complacent
5 uses
He had become complacent after years of success.
complacent = contented (unworried and satisfied) — often to a fault
Word Statistics
Book5 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
SATtop 1000
1st useChapter 21
Web Links
conciliatory
2 uses
Their statements are conciliatory, but their actions are uncompromising.
conciliatory = intended to end bad feelings or build trust
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 36
Web Links
conjecture
16 uses
She dismissed it as mere conjecture.
conjecture = a conclusion or opinion based on inconclusive evidence
DefinitionGenerally conjecture means:
a conclusion or opinion based on inconclusive evidence; or the act of forming of such a conclusion or opinion
Word Statistics
Book16 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 46
Web Links
credulous
1 use
The trick would fool none but the most credulous.
credulous = gullible (being too willing to believe)
Word Statistics
Book1 uses
Library1 uses in 10 avg bks
SATtop 1000
1st useChapter 21
Web Links
depravity
1 use
It is a terrible story of an innocent who trusted a man who treated her with ruthless depravity.
depravity = complete immorality or evilness
Word Statistics
Book1 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 29
Web Links
entreat
19 uses
She flattered and entreated him until he agreed to help.
entreated = asked or attempted to persuade
DefinitionGenerally entreat means:
to ask or attempt to persuade — especially while trying hard to overcome resistance
Word Statistics
Book19 uses
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 6
Web Links
expedient
5 uses
It was a necessary expedient to get the job done.
expedient = a speedy or practical action

(The word necessary, implies that there were undesired aspects of the action.)
DefinitionGenerally expedient means:
a practical action — especially one that accepts negative tradeoffs due to circumstances

or:

convenient, speedy, or practical
Word Statistics
Book5 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 49
Web Links
fastidious
2 uses
He is fastidious in his grooming.
fastidious = giving careful attention to detail

or:

excessively concerned with cleanliness or matters of taste
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 18
Web Links
hackneyed
2 uses
She writes in a hackneyed manner with nothing original.
hackneyed = writing that is unimaginative and filled with overused expressions, ideas, and formulas
DefinitionGenerally hackneyed means:
lacking impact due to too much previous exposure — especially writing that is unimaginative and filled with overused expressions, ideas, and formulas
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 18
Web Links
impetuous
2 uses
She regretted her impetuous promise.
impetuous = impulsive (made suddenly without much thought)
DefinitionGenerally this sense of impetuous means:
impulsive (acting suddenly without much thought) — often with an unfortunate consequence
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library1 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 31
Web Links
indolent
2 uses
She never recovered from the indolence of her youth.
indolence = laziness
DefinitionGenerally this sense of indolent means:
lazy; disinclined to work
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 46
Web Links
insipid
6 uses
I don't care for the author. I think her novels are insipid.
insipid = dull (uninteresting and unimpactful)
Word Statistics
Book6 uses
Library1 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 7
Web Links
obstinate
2 uses
She is an obstinate child who will not follow the family rules.
obstinate = stubbornly not doing what others want
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 37
Web Links
penury
1 use
The couple suffered from substance abuse, gambling, lack of family support, and other social ills that lead to penury.
penury = a state of extreme poverty or destitution
Word Statistics
Book1 uses
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 37
Web Links
servile
1 use
She acknowledged her submission in a servile tone.
servile = excessively submissive
DefinitionGenerally servile means:
submissive — typically excessively so (so submissive or eager to serve and please that one seems to have no self-respect)

or:

relating to the work that requires obeying demeaning commands

or:

slave-like or relating to slaves
Word Statistics
Book1 uses
Library1 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 44
Web Links
zeal
3 uses
She attacks each challenge with zeal.
zeal = active interest and enthusiasm
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 8
Web Links
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