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vocabulary
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Jane Eyre
Vocabulary

Extra Credit Words with Sample Sentences from the Book

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ameliorate
1 use
Spring drew on: she was indeed already come; the frosts of winter had ceased; its snows were melted, its cutting winds ameliorated.
ameliorated = improved (something that was bad)
DefinitionGenerally ameliorate means:
to improve — especially a bad situation
Word Statistics
Book1 uses
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 9
Web Links
apathy
2 uses
...he shares Mary's apathetic and listless look:
apathetic = lacking interest or enthusiasm
DefinitionGenerally apathy means:
lack of interest and enthusiasm
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 17
Web Links
ascetic
1 use
There was something ascetic in her look, which was augmented by the extreme plainness of a straight-skirted, black, stuff dress, a starched linen collar, hair combed away from the temples, and the nun-like ornament of a string of ebony beads and a crucifix.
ascetic = severely plain — like one who practices self-denial (often to encourage spiritual growth)
DefinitionGenerally ascetic means:
someone who practices self-denial (often to encourage spiritual growth); or relating to such self-denial

or:

severely plain (without decoration)
Word Statistics
Book1 uses
Library1 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 21
Web Links
cadence
1 use
Sometimes, preoccupied with her work, she sang the refrain very low, very lingeringly; "A long time ago" came out like the saddest cadence of a funeral hymn.
cadence = rhythm
DefinitionGenerally cadence means:
rhythm or recurring pattern of sounds or movements
Word Statistics
Book1 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 3
Web Links
capricious
10 uses
she had a capricious and hasty temper
capricious = impulsive and unpredictable
DefinitionGenerally capricious means:
impulsive or unpredictable or tending to make sudden changes — especially impulsive behavior
Word Statistics
Book10 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 4
Web Links
clergy
1 use
"I am a clergyman," he said; "and the clergy are often appealed to about odd matters."
clergy = formal religious leaders (typically in Christianity)
Word Statistics
Book1 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 33
Web Links
credulous
1 use
Really your organs of wonder and credulity are easily excited:
credulity = gullibility (being too willing to believe)
DefinitionGenerally credulous means:
gullible (being too willing to believe)
Word Statistics
Book1 uses
Library1 uses in 10 avg bks
SATtop 1000
1st useChapter 18
Web Links
depravity
1 use
a nature the most gross, impure, depraved I ever saw, was associated with mine,
depraved = completely immoral or evil
DefinitionGenerally depravity means:
complete immorality or evilness
Word Statistics
Book1 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 27
Web Links
disparage
1 use
Don't tell me so — lest I should say something disparaging to your judgment.
disparaging = critical
DefinitionGenerally disparage means:
to criticize or make seem less important — especially in a disrespectful or contemptuous manner
Word Statistics
Book1 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
SATtop 1000
1st useChapter 37
Web Links
dogmatic
1 use
it reminded me of Mrs. Reed's; she mouthed her words in speaking; her voice was deep, its inflections very pompous, very dogmatical, — very intolerable, in short.
dogmatical = prone to stating opinions as absolute truth
Word Statistics
Book1 uses
Library1 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 17
Web Links
encroach
2 uses
Encroach, presume, and the game is up.
encroach = gradually take rights or property that belongs to another
DefinitionGenerally encroach means:
to gradually take another's rights or property
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 18
Web Links
expedient
7 uses
I was not fond of pampering that susceptible vanity of his; but for once, and from motives of expediency, I would e'en soothe and stimulate it.
expediency = speed or practicality
DefinitionGenerally expedient means:
a practical action — especially one that accepts negative tradeoffs due to circumstances

or:

convenient, speedy, or practical
Word Statistics
Book7 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 30
Web Links
hackneyed
3 uses
I have seen a gipsy vagabond; she has practised in hackneyed fashion the science of palmistry and told me what such people usually tell.
hackneyed = lacking impact due to too much previous exposure
DefinitionGenerally hackneyed means:
lacking impact due to too much previous exposure — especially writing that is unimaginative and filled with overused expressions, ideas, and formulas
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 14
Web Links
hinder
2 uses
No weather seemed to hinder him in these pastoral excursions: rain or fair, he would, when his hours of morning study were over, take his hat, and, followed by his father's old pointer, Carlo, go out on his mission of love or duty — I scarcely know in which light he regarded it.
hinder = cause problems that slowed
DefinitionGenerally this sense of hinder means:
slow down or cause problems for
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 17
Web Links
indolent
1 use
Eliza generally took no more notice of her sister's indolence and complaints than if no such murmuring, lounging object had been before her.
indolence = laziness
DefinitionGenerally this sense of indolent means:
lazy; disinclined to work
Word Statistics
Book1 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 21
Web Links
perfidy
2 uses
I had my own reasons for being dismayed at this apparition; too well I remembered the perfidious hints given by Mrs. Reed about my disposition,
perfidious = betraying
DefinitionGenerally perfidy means:
an act of deliberate betrayal; or such behavior
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library1 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 7
Web Links
repudiate
1 use
In the eyes of the world, I was doubtless covered with grimy dishonour; but I resolved to be clean in my own sight — and to the last I repudiated the contamination of her crimes, and wrenched myself from connection with her mental defects.
repudiated = strongly rejected
DefinitionGenerally repudiate means:
strong rejection — especially when the idea or thing being rejected was once embraced
Word Statistics
Book1 uses
Library1 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 27
Web Links
taint
1 use
Heart-weary and soul-withered, you come home after years of voluntary banishment: you make a new acquaintance — how or where no matter: you find in this stranger much of the good and bright qualities which you have sought for twenty years, and never before encountered; and they are all fresh, healthy, without soil and without taint.
taint = anything that spoils them
DefinitionGenerally taint means:
to spoil something so it is not desirable — as when bacteria contaminates a food; or as when a rumor makes people distrust a person
Word Statistics
Book1 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 20
Web Links
venerate
5 uses
I deeply venerated my cousin's talent and principle.
venerated = regarded with feelings of respect and reverence
DefinitionGenerally venerate means:
regard with feelings of respect and reverence
Word Statistics
Book5 uses
Library1 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 5
Web Links
vivacious
14 uses
still I accosted him with what vivacity I could.
vivacity = engaging liveliness
DefinitionGenerally vivacious means:
an engaging liveliness
Word Statistics
Book14 uses
Library1 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 18
Web Links
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