toggle menu
menu
vocabulary
1000+ books
Book Menu

Jane Eyre
Vocabulary

Extra Credit Words with Sample Sentences from the Book

(click/touch triangles for details)
accord   (3 meanings)
3 meanings, 22 uses
1  —17 uses as in:
according to, or in accord with
I wished to see whether her appearance accorded with Mrs. Fairfax's description;
accorded = was in agreement
DefinitionGenerally this sense of accord means:
in keeping with; or in agreement/harmony/unity with
This sense of accord is often seen in the form according to where it can take on more specific meanings. For example:
  • "According to Kim, ..." — as stated by
  • "To each according to her ability." — based upon
  • "Points are scored according to how well they perform." — depending upon
  • "The dose is calculated according to body weight." — in proportion to
Word Statistics
Book17 uses
Library46 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 5
Web Links
2  —4 uses as in:
done of her own accord
Shake me off, then, sir, — push me away, for I'll not leave you of my own accord.
own accord = voluntarily
DefinitionGenerally this sense of accord means:
mind — voluntarily (without anyone asking)
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 37
Web Links
3  —1 use as in:
accord her the respect deserved
...every privilege, every attention shall be yours that I would accord a peer's daughter, if about to marry her.
accord = give as special treatment to
DefinitionGenerally this sense of accord means:
to give someone special treatment — especially respect
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 24
Web Links
ameliorate
1 use
Spring drew on: she was indeed already come; the frosts of winter had ceased; its snows were melted, its cutting winds ameliorated.
ameliorated = improved (something that was bad)
DefinitionGenerally ameliorate means:
to improve — especially a bad situation
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 9
Web Links
capricious
10 uses
she had a capricious and hasty temper
capricious = impulsive and unpredictable
DefinitionGenerally capricious means:
impulsive or unpredictable or tending to make sudden changes — especially impulsive behavior
Word Statistics
Book10 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 4
Web Links
correspond
6 uses
1  —1 use as in:
foreign correspondent of the paper
Mr. Eyre has been the Funchal correspondent of his house for some years.
correspondent = reporter

(editor's note:  Funchal is a city in Portugal.)
DefinitionGenerally this sense of correspondent means:
a reporter — typically from a foreign country or with a particular expertise
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 26
Web Links
?  —5 uses
exact meaning not specified
or not quizzed
countenance   (2 meanings)
2 meanings, 2 uses
1  —1 use as in:
a pleasant countenance
...all their countenances expressed displeasure,
countenances = facial expressions
DefinitionGenerally this sense of countenance means:
facial expression; or face; or composure
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 5
Web Links
2  —1 use as in:
giving countenance
I cannot possibly countenance any such inconsistent proceeding,
countenance = accept or permit
DefinitionGenerally this sense of countenance means:
to tolerate, approve, or show favor or support
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 18
Web Links
credulous
1 use
Really your organs of wonder and credulity are easily excited:
credulity = gullibility (being too willing to believe)
DefinitionGenerally credulous means:
gullible (being too willing to believe)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 18
Web Links
defer
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
deferred the decision
He deferred his departure a whole week,
deferred = postponed (delayed)
DefinitionGenerally this sense of defer means:
postpone (hold off until a later time)
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 500
1st useChapter 35
Web Links
dogmatic
1 use
it reminded me of Mrs. Reed's; she mouthed her words in speaking; her voice was deep, its inflections very pompous, very dogmatical, — very intolerable, in short.
dogmatical = prone to stating opinions as absolute truth
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 17
Web Links
hackneyed
3 uses
I have seen a gipsy vagabond; she has practised in hackneyed fashion the science of palmistry and told me what such people usually tell.
hackneyed = lacking impact due to too much previous exposure
DefinitionGenerally hackneyed means:
lacking impact due to too much previous exposure — especially writing that is unimaginative and filled with overused expressions, ideas, and formulas
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 14
Web Links
haughty
14 uses
She turned as I drew near, and looked at me haughtily:
haughtily = condescendingly (in a superior or self-important manner)
DefinitionGenerally haughty means:
arrogant or condescending (acting superior or self-important)
Word Statistics
Book14 uses
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 17
Web Links
hypothesis
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
a study to test her hypothesis
But, sir, when I said so to myself on rising this morning, and when I looked round the room to gather courage and comfort from the cheerful aspect of each familiar object in full daylight, there — on the carpet — I saw what gave the distinct lie to my hypothesis, — the veil, torn from top to bottom in two halves!†
hypothesis = a seemingly reasonable, but unproven, idea or explanation
DefinitionGenerally this sense of hypothesis means:
seemingly reasonable, but unproven idea or explanation based upon known facts
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 25
Web Links
illustrate
3 uses
1  —3 uses as in:
as illustrated by this example
Hear an illustration, reader.†
illustration = something that helps clarify or demonstrate
DefinitionGenerally this sense of illustrate means:
to help make clear — typically by example
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 10
1st useChapter 18
Web Links
obscure   (3 meanings)
3 meanings, 16 uses
1  —2 uses as in:
it obscured my view
He informed me then, that for some time he had fancied the obscurity clouding one eye was becoming less dense; and that now he was sure of it.
obscurity = something that blocks a view (in this case probably a medical condition where they eye lens gets cloudy—a cataract)
DefinitionGenerally this sense of obscure means:
to block from view or make less visible or understandable
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 38
Web Links
2  —8 uses as in:
knows the famous and the obscure
Do you think, because I am poor, obscure, plain, and little, I am soulless and heartless?
obscure = undistinguished
DefinitionGenerally this sense of obscure means:
not known to many people; or unimportant or undistinguished
Word Statistics
Book8 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 30
Web Links
3  —6 uses as in:
was obscure, but now bright
Having completed her task, she rose to draw down the blind, which she had hitherto kept up, by way, I suppose, of making the most of daylight, though dusk was now fast deepening into total obscurity.
obscurity = darkness
DefinitionGenerally this sense of obscure means:
dark or dingy; or inconspicuous (not very noticeable)
Word Statistics
Book6 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 16
Web Links
passage
1 use
...as interesting as the tales Bessie sometimes narrated on winter evenings, when she chanced to be in good humour; and when, having brought her ironing-table to the nursery hearth, she allowed us to sit about it, and while she got up Mrs. Reed's lace frills, and crimped her nightcap borders, fed our eager attention with passages of love and adventure taken from old fairy tales and other ballads; or (as at a later period I discovered) from the pages of Pamela, and Henry, Earl of Moreland.†
passages = short parts of longer written works
DefinitionGenerally this sense of passage means:
a short part of a longer written work
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 1
Web Links
vivacious
14 uses
still I accosted him with what vivacity I could.
vivacity = engaging liveliness
DefinitionGenerally vivacious means:
having an engaging liveliness — when said of a person, typically said of a female
Word Statistics
Book14 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 18
Web Links
Take Quiz
Go to Book Menu
Browse with Large-Screen
(more words/choices)
† 
Sample usage followed by this mark was not checked by an editor. Please let us know if you spot a problem.
SAT® is a registered trademark of the College Board, which is not affiliated with verbalworkout.com™, and does not endorse this site.