toggle menu
menu
vocabulary
1000+ books

Jane Eyre
Vocabulary

Extra Credit Words with Typical Sample Sentences

(click/touch triangles for details)
ameliorate
1 use
The drug ameliorates the toxic effects of chemotherapy.
ameliorates = improves (something that is bad)
DefinitionGenerally ameliorate means:
to improve — especially a bad situation
Word Statistics
Book1 uses
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 9
Web Links
apathy
2 uses
Seeing too much senior apathy, the high school began having juniors declare a major for their senior year.
apathy = lack of interest and enthusiasm
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 17
Web Links
ascetic
1 use
The ascetic life has been more pronounced in Hinduism and Buddhism than in other major religions.
ascetic = the practice of self-denial
DefinitionGenerally ascetic means:
someone who practices self-denial (often to encourage spiritual growth); or relating to such self-denial

or:

severely plain (without decoration)
Word Statistics
Book1 uses
Library1 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 21
Web Links
cadence
1 use
The sound of the waves crashing on the shore had a comforting cadence.
cadence = rhythm or recurring pattern
DefinitionGenerally cadence means:
rhythm or recurring pattern of sounds or movements
Word Statistics
Book1 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 3
Web Links
capricious
10 uses
Nothing seems more capricious than a tornado.
capricious = impulsive or unpredictable
DefinitionGenerally capricious means:
impulsive or unpredictable or tending to make sudden changes — especially impulsive behavior
Word Statistics
Book10 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 4
Web Links
clergy
1 use
Under labor law, the clergy can be required to uphold the beliefs of the religion they have chosen.
clergy = formal religious leaders (typically in Christianity)
Word Statistics
Book1 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 33
Web Links
credulous
1 use
The trick would fool none but the most credulous.
credulous = gullible (being too willing to believe)
Word Statistics
Book1 uses
Library1 uses in 10 avg bks
SATtop 1000
1st useChapter 18
Web Links
depravity
1 use
It is a terrible story of an innocent who trusted a man who treated her with ruthless depravity.
depravity = complete immorality or evilness
Word Statistics
Book1 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 27
Web Links
disparage
1 use
She has a reputation for disparaging the efforts of her co-workers.
disparaging = criticizing or making seem less important
DefinitionGenerally disparage means:
to criticize or make seem less important — especially in a disrespectful or contemptuous manner
Word Statistics
Book1 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
SATtop 1000
1st useChapter 37
Web Links
dogmatic
1 use
The dogmatic coach is fond of saying, "My way's the right way. Your way's the wrong way!"
dogmatic = prone to stating opinions as absolute truth
Word Statistics
Book1 uses
Library1 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 17
Web Links
encroach
2 uses
The city's expansion is encroaching on the fragile wetlands.
encroaching = gradually taking another's rights or property
DefinitionGenerally encroach means:
to gradually take another's rights or property
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 18
Web Links
expedient
7 uses
It was a necessary expedient to get the job done.
expedient = a speedy or practical action

(The word necessary, implies that there were undesired aspects of the action.)
DefinitionGenerally expedient means:
a practical action — especially one that accepts negative tradeoffs due to circumstances

or:

convenient, speedy, or practical
Word Statistics
Book7 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 30
Web Links
hackneyed
3 uses
She writes in a hackneyed manner with nothing original.
hackneyed = writing that is unimaginative and filled with overused expressions, ideas, and formulas
DefinitionGenerally hackneyed means:
lacking impact due to too much previous exposure — especially writing that is unimaginative and filled with overused expressions, ideas, and formulas
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 14
Web Links
hinder
2 uses
Her efforts to turn the department around were further hindered by budgetary cuts.
hindered = slowed down or caused problems for
DefinitionGenerally this sense of hinder means:
slow down or cause problems for
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 17
Web Links
indolent
1 use
She never recovered from the indolence of her youth.
indolence = laziness
DefinitionGenerally this sense of indolent means:
lazy; disinclined to work
Word Statistics
Book1 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 21
Web Links
perfidy
2 uses
She is guilty of perfidy if not treason.
perfidy = an act of deliberate betrayal
DefinitionGenerally perfidy means:
an act of deliberate betrayal; or such behavior
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library1 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 7
Web Links
repudiate
1 use
The parents repudiated their son.
repudiated = strongly rejected
DefinitionGenerally repudiate means:
strong rejection — especially when the idea or thing being rejected was once embraced
Word Statistics
Book1 uses
Library1 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 27
Web Links
taint
1 use
Authorities said the milk was tainted with rat poison.
tainted = spoiled or contaminated
DefinitionGenerally taint means:
to spoil something so it is not desirable — as when bacteria contaminates a food; or as when a rumor makes people distrust a person
Word Statistics
Book1 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 20
Web Links
venerate
5 uses
Most contemporary Hindus do not actually worship the cow; though many venerate her.
venerate = regard with feelings of respect and reverence
Word Statistics
Book5 uses
Library1 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 5
Web Links
vivacious
14 uses
She's a charming and vivacious hostess.
vivacious = has an engaging liveliness
DefinitionGenerally vivacious means:
an engaging liveliness
Word Statistics
Book14 uses
Library1 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 18
Web Links
Take Quiz
Return to Book Menu
Go to Large-Screen Version
(more words)