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Moby Dick
Vocabulary

Extra Credit Words with Typical Sample Sentences

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advocate
3 uses
1  —3 uses as in:
an advocate in court
She is a U.S. Army judge advocate.
advocate = a lawyer for the military
DefinitionGenerally this sense of advocate means:
a lawyer or officer of the court in some jurisdictions in Europe, colonial America, and the military
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 22-24
augment
5 uses
Our school district hired a new counselor to augment our college counseling service.
augment = enlarge or increase
Word Statistics
Book5 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 85-87
Web Links
capricious
5 uses
Nothing seems more capricious than a tornado.
capricious = impulsive or unpredictable
DefinitionGenerally capricious means:
impulsive or unpredictable or tending to make sudden changes — especially impulsive behavior
Word Statistics
Book5 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 52-54
Web Links
countenance
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
a pleasant countenance
She has a pleasant countenance.
countenance = facial expression; or face
DefinitionGenerally this sense of countenance means:
facial expression; or face; or composure
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 31-33
Web Links
diligent
10 uses
She's the kind of diligent worker we want to hire.
diligent = showing hard work and care
DefinitionGenerally diligent means:
hard work and care in tasks — often continuing when others might quit because of difficulties
Word Statistics
Book10 uses
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1-3
Web Links
fallacious
1 use
She reached a false conclusion that was based on fallacious reasoning.
fallacious = mistaken (based on incorrect information or belief)
DefinitionGenerally fallacious means:
not correct
  • typically describing something as mistaken due to incorrect information or belief
  • sometimes describing something as an intentional lie
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 103-105
Web Links
forbearance
7 uses
She recommended regulatory forbearance while the banks repair their balance sheets.
forbearance = refraining (holding back) from acting
DefinitionGenerally forbearance means:
refraining (holding back) from acting

or:

patience, tolerance, or self-control
Word Statistics
Book7 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 52-54
Web Links
hypothesis
5 uses
1  —5 uses as in:
a study to test her hypothesis
The study will test the hypothesis that a good marriage is more important than a higher income when measuring happiness.
hypothesis = a seemingly reasonable, but unproven, idea or explanation
DefinitionGenerally this sense of hypothesis means:
seemingly reasonable, but unproven idea or explanation based upon known facts
Word Statistics
Book5 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 76-78
Web Links
impetuous
4 uses
She regretted her impetuous promise.
impetuous = impulsive (made suddenly without much thought)
DefinitionGenerally this sense of impetuous means:
impulsive (acting suddenly without much thought) — often with an unfortunate consequence
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 49-51
Web Links
indolent
9 uses
She never recovered from the indolence of her youth.
indolence = laziness
DefinitionGenerally this sense of indolent means:
lazy; disinclined to work
Word Statistics
Book9 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 34-36
Web Links
inflexible
4 uses
They accused her of being stubborn and inflexible.
inflexible = unbending (not willing to compromise or make concessions)
DefinitionGenerally inflexible means:
not bendable or adaptable
in various senses, including:
  • not willing to compromise or make concessions — as when a boss says "Do it my way or you're fired."
  • not able to adjust well to different conditions — as of a schedule that cannot be changed
  • not easily bent without physical damage or injury — as of brittle steel or person with stiff joints
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 52-54
Web Links
mitigate
2 uses
Don't judge her so harshly until you consider the mitigating circumstances.
mitigating = making less harmful or unpleasant
DefinitionGenerally mitigate means:
make less harmful or unpleasant
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 40-42
Web Links
obscure   (2 meanings)
2 meanings, 9 uses
1  —5 uses as in:
it obscured my view
The stars are obscured by the clouds.
obscured = hidden or made less visible
DefinitionGenerally this sense of obscure means:
to block from view or make less visible or understandable
Word Statistics
Book5 uses
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 67-69
Web Links
2  —4 uses as in:
the view or directions are obscure
For some obscure reason that goes back many years, they don't like each other.
obscure = not clearly understood
DefinitionGenerally this sense of obscure means:
not clearly seen, understood, or expressed
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 1000
1st useChapter 52-54
Web Links
obstinate
4 uses
She is an obstinate child who will not follow the family rules.
obstinate = stubbornly not doing what others want
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 49-51
Web Links
ostentatious
6 uses
Although wealthy, the family is not ostentatious.
ostentatious = showy (trying to attract notice and impress others in a manner seen as in bad taste)
DefinitionGenerally ostentatious means:
intended to attract notice and impress others — especially with wealth in a vulgar way
Word Statistics
Book6 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 34-36
Web Links
passage
4 uses
Each passage below is followed by a number of questions.
passage = a short part of a longer written work
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
SAT®*top 100
1st useChapter 61-63
Web Links
prodigious
19 uses
As a child, Mozart had a prodigious talent.
prodigious = enormous
DefinitionGenerally prodigious means:
enormous; or far beyond what is usual in magnitude or degree
Word Statistics
Book19 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 16-18
Web Links
remonstrate
5 uses
When she has a complaint with her staff, she will remonstrate quietly and in private.
remonstrate = argue in protest or opposition
Word Statistics
Book5 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 16-18
Web Links
reprehensible
1 use
Cheating is reprehensible.
reprehensible = bad and unacceptable — deserving severe criticism
Word Statistics
Book1 use
Library1 use in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 82-84
Web Links
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