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Pride and Prejudice
Vocabulary

Extra Credit Words with Sample Sentences from the Book

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alternative
3 uses
1  —3 uses as in:
an alternative plan
Elizabeth, feeling really anxious, was determined to go to her, though the carriage was not to be had; and as she was no horsewoman, walking was her only alternative.
alternative = other possibility
DefinitionGenerally this sense of alternative means:
something available as another possibility
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
SATtop 100
1st useChapter 7
Web Links
benevolent
4 uses
She tried to recollect some instance of goodness, some distinguished trait of integrity or benevolence, that might rescue him from the attacks of Mr. Darcy;
benevolence = kindness or generosity
DefinitionGenerally benevolent means:
kind, generous, or charitable
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 7
Web Links
capricious
4 uses
...his pride and caprice were the cause, of all that Jane had suffered, and still continued to suffer.
caprice = impulsive behavior
DefinitionGenerally capricious means:
impulsive or unpredictable or tending to make sudden changes — especially impulsive behavior
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1
Web Links
censure
8 uses
You will be censured, slighted, and despised, by everyone connected with him.
censured = criticized
DefinitionGenerally censure means:
harsh criticism; or formal criticism from an organization — such as the U.S. Senate
Word Statistics
Book8 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 4
Web Links
complacent
5 uses
Jane met her with a smile of such sweet complacency, a glow of such happy expression, as sufficiently marked how well she was satisfied with the occurrences of the evening.
complacency = contentment (happiness)
DefinitionGenerally complacent means:
contented (unworried and satisfied) — often to a fault
Word Statistics
Book5 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
SATtop 1000
1st useChapter 5
Web Links
condescending
15 uses
Her ladyship, with great condescension, arose to receive them;
condescension = doing something considered beneath one's position or dignity
DefinitionGenerally condescending means:
treating others as inferior; or doing something considered beneath one's position or dignity
Word Statistics
Book15 uses
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 48
Web Links
conjecture
15 uses
It was a painful, but not an improbable, conjecture.
conjecture = conclusion or opinion based on inconclusive evidence
DefinitionGenerally conjecture means:
a conclusion or opinion based on inconclusive evidence; or the act of forming of such a conclusion or opinion
Word Statistics
Book15 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 2
Web Links
defer
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
deferred the decision
Arguments are too much like disputes.  If you and Miss Bennet will defer yours till I am out of the room, I shall be very thankful;
defer = postpone
DefinitionGenerally this sense of defer means:
postpone (hold off until a later time)
Word Statistics
Book1 uses
Library1 uses in 10 avg bks
SATtop 1000
1st useChapter 10
Web Links
depravity
1 use
Wilfully and wantonly to have thrown off the companion of my youth, the acknowledged favourite of my father, a young man who had scarcely any other dependence than on our patronage, and who had been brought up to expect its exertion, would be a depravity,
depravity = immoral or evil act
DefinitionGenerally depravity means:
complete immorality or evilness
Word Statistics
Book1 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 35
Web Links
deride
2 uses
[the world's] derision for disappointed hopes
derision = disrespect — typically while laughing at or making fun of
DefinitionGenerally deride means:
laugh at or make fun of—while showing a lack of respect
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 18
Web Links
duplicity
2 uses
If I were not afraid of judging harshly, I should be almost tempted to say that there is a strong appearance of duplicity in all this.
duplicity = deception
DefinitionGenerally duplicity means:
deception (lying to or misleading others) — usually over an extended period
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library1 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 26
Web Links
entreat
20 uses
I entreat you not to suppose that I moved this way in order to beg for a partner.
entreat = ask
DefinitionGenerally entreat means:
to ask or attempt to persuade — especially while trying hard to overcome resistance
Word Statistics
Book20 uses
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 6
Web Links
expedient
2 uses
It had been settled in the evening between the aunt and the niece, that such a striking civility as Miss Darcy's in coming to see them on the very day of her arrival at Pemberley, for she had reached it only to a late breakfast, ought to be imitated, though it could not be equalled, by some exertion of politeness on their side; and, consequently, that it would be highly expedient to wait on her at Pemberley the following morning.
expedient = practical
DefinitionGenerally expedient means:
a practical action — especially one that accepts negative tradeoffs due to circumstances

or:

convenient, speedy, or practical
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 22
Web Links
forbearance
8 uses
he listened to all their impertinence with the most forbearing courtesy.
forbearing = patient and tolerant
DefinitionGenerally forbearance means:
refraining (holding back) from acting

or:

patience, tolerance, or self-control
Word Statistics
Book8 uses
Library1 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 18
Web Links
hackneyed
1 use
But that expression of "violently in love" is so hackneyed, so doubtful, so indefinite, that it gives me very little idea.
hackneyed = lacking in impact due to too much previous exposure
DefinitionGenerally hackneyed means:
lacking impact due to too much previous exposure — especially writing that is unimaginative and filled with overused expressions, ideas, and formulas
Word Statistics
Book1 uses
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 25
Web Links
impetuous
1 use
Her pale face and impetuous manner made him start, and before he could recover himself to speak, she...
impetuous = impulsive

(editor's note:  In this context, "made him start" means "startled him".)
DefinitionGenerally this sense of impetuous means:
impulsive (acting suddenly without much thought) — often with an unfortunate consequence
Word Statistics
Book1 uses
Library1 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 46
Web Links
indolent
3 uses
he was an indolent man, who lived only to eat, drink, and play at cards;
indolent = lazy
DefinitionGenerally this sense of indolent means:
lazy; disinclined to work
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 47
Web Links
ostentatious
2 uses
They were then, with no other delay than his pointing out the neatness of the entrance, taken into the house; and as soon as they were in the parlour, he welcomed them a second time, with ostentatious formality to his humble abode,
ostentatious = intended to impress others
DefinitionGenerally ostentatious means:
intended to attract notice and impress others — especially with wealth in a vulgar way
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 28
Web Links
reprehensible
3 uses
She could only imagine, however, at last that she drew his notice because there was something more wrong and reprehensible, according to his ideas of right, than in any other person present.
reprehensible = bad and unacceptable
DefinitionGenerally reprehensible means:
bad and unacceptable — deserving severe criticism
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library1 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 10
Web Links
sagacious
1 use
Young ladies have great penetration in such matters as these; but I think I may defy even your sagacity, to discover the name of your admirer.
sagacity = wisdom
DefinitionGenerally sagacious means:
wise — especially through long experience and thoughtfulness
Word Statistics
Book1 uses
Library1 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 57
Web Links
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