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vocabulary
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Frankenstein
Vocabulary

Extra Credit Words with Sample Sentences from the Book

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ameliorate
1 use
I felt the greatest eagerness to hear the promised narrative, partly from curiosity and partly from a strong desire to ameliorate his fate if it were in my power.
ameliorate = improve
DefinitionGenerally ameliorate means:
to improve — especially a bad situation
Word Statistics
Book1 uses
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useIntr.
Web Links
amiable
14 uses
During all that period she appeared to me the most amiable and benevolent of human creatures.
amiable = friendly and kindly
Word Statistics
Book14 uses
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useIntr.
Web Links
compensate
3 uses
1  —3 uses as in:
he compensates with extra effort
My daily vows rose for revenge—a deep and deadly revenge, such as would alone compensate for the outrages and anguish I had endured.
compensate = make up for
DefinitionGenerally this sense of compensate means:
make up for; or adjust for
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
SATtop 500
1st useChapter 6
Web Links
conjecture
12 uses
This account rather alarmed us, and we continued to search for him until night fell, when Elizabeth conjectured that he might have returned to the house.
conjectured = guessed based on inconclusive evidence
DefinitionGenerally conjecture means:
a conclusion or opinion based on inconclusive evidence; or the act of forming of such a conclusion or opinion
Word Statistics
Book12 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 7
Web Links
contrast
5 uses
1  —5 uses as in:
there is a contrast
Harmony was the soul of our companionship, and the diversity and contrast that subsisted in our characters drew us nearer together.
contrast = notable difference
DefinitionGenerally this sense of contrast means:
a difference — especially a notable difference; or the side-x-side arrangement of things that draws attention to an unmissable difference
Word Statistics
Book5 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
SATtop 100
1st useChapter 2
Web Links
despondent
12 uses
...his eyes and attitude expressed the utmost sadness and despondency.
despondency = depression
DefinitionGenerally despondent means:
emotionally depressed — especially a feeling of grief and hopelessness after a loss
Word Statistics
Book12 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 11
Web Links
dogmatic
1 use
His gentleness was never tinged by dogmatism, and his instructions were given with an air of frankness and good nature that banished every idea of pedantry.
dogmatism = stating opinions as absolute truth
DefinitionGenerally dogmatic means:
prone to stating opinions as absolute truth
Word Statistics
Book1 uses
Library1 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 4
Web Links
elude
5 uses
1  —5 uses as in:
he eluded the police
My rage was without bounds; I sprang on him.... He easily eluded me and said, "Be calm!"
eluded = avoided (got away from)
DefinitionGenerally this sense of elude means:
to avoid, or get away from, or remain out of reach — as in:
  • "She eluded the police."
  • She eluded danger and finally arrived safely at home.
  • Success has eluded me so far.
  • She always messes up, but some how eludes taking responsibility
Word Statistics
Book5 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 10
Web Links
entreat
18 uses
My dear son, I entreat you never to make such an assertion again.
entreat = ask
DefinitionGenerally entreat means:
to ask or attempt to persuade — especially while trying hard to overcome resistance
Word Statistics
Book18 uses
Library6 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 3
Web Links
epithet
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
racial epithet
The child still struggled and loaded me with epithets which carried despair to my heart; I grasped his throat to silence him, and in a moment he lay dead at my feet.
epithets = insulting or abusive words or phrases
DefinitionGenerally this sense of epithet means:
an insulting or abusive word or phrase
Word Statistics
Book1 uses
Library1 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 16
Web Links
implement
1 use
1  —1 use as in:
a small implement
I have copies of these letters, for I found means, during my residence in the hovel, to procure the implements of writing; and the letters were often in the hands of Felix or Agatha.
implements = small tools or other useful objects
DefinitionGenerally this sense of implement means:
a small tool or other useful object
Word Statistics
Book1 uses
Library1 uses in 10 avg bks
SATtop 1000
1st useChapter 14
Web Links
innumerable
5 uses
I could mention innumerable instances which, although slight, marked the dispositions of these amiable cottagers.
innumerable = too numerous to be counted
Word Statistics
Book5 uses
Library3 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 11
Web Links
obscure   (4 meanings)
4 meanings, 10 uses
1  —3 uses as in:
it obscured my view
I had been calm during the day, but so soon as night obscured the shapes of objects, a thousand fears arose in my mind.
obscured = made less visible
DefinitionGenerally this sense of obscure means:
to block from view or make less visible or understandable
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library5 uses in 10 avg bks
SATtop 2000
1st useChapter 23
Web Links
2  —3 uses as in:
the view or directions are obscure
In the Sorrows of Werter, besides the interest of its simple and affecting story, so many opinions are canvassed and so many lights thrown upon what had hitherto been to me obscure subjects that I found in it a never-ending source of speculation and astonishment.
obscure = little understood
DefinitionGenerally this sense of obscure means:
not clearly seen, understood, or expressed
Word Statistics
Book3 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
SATtop 2000
1st useChapter 9
Web Links
3  —2 uses as in:
knows the famous and the obscure
He had previously communicated his plan to the former, who aided the deceit by quitting his house, under the pretence of a journey and concealed himself, with his daughter, in an obscure part of Paris.
obscure = not known to many people; or undistinguished
DefinitionGenerally this sense of obscure means:
not known to many people; or unimportant or undistinguished
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library2 uses in 10 avg bks
SATtop 2000
1st useChapter 14
Web Links
4  —2 uses as in:
was obscure, but now bright
Clouds hid the moon, everything was obscure, and I heard only the sound of the boat as its keel cut through the waves; the murmur lulled me, and in a short time I slept soundly.
obscure = dark
DefinitionGenerally this sense of obscure means:
dark or dingy; or inconspicuous (not very noticeable)
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library4 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 10
Web Links
penury
2 uses
It contained but two rooms, and these exhibited all the squalidness of the most miserable penury.
penury = a state of extreme poverty or destitution
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library0 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 1
Web Links
sagacious
2 uses
Besides, I found that my understanding improved so much with every day's experience that I was unwilling to commence this undertaking until a few more months should have added to my sagacity.
sagacity = wisdom
DefinitionGenerally sagacious means:
wise — especially through long experience and thoughtfulness
Word Statistics
Book2 uses
Library1 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 15
Web Links
transitory
4 uses
These feelings are transitory;
transitory = lasting a short time
Word Statistics
Book4 uses
Library1 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 4
Web Links
vacillate
1 use
The poor woman was very vacillating in her repentance.
vacillating = changing one's mind back and forth between conflicting ideas
DefinitionGenerally vacillate means:
to change one's mind back and forth between conflicting ideas

or:

to sway back and forth
Word Statistics
Book1 uses
Library1 uses in 10 avg bks
1st useChapter 6
Web Links
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