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Fugitive Slave Law
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Definition 1850 law authorizing the return of a fugitive slave to his master and five years imprisonment to anyone who helped a fugitive
  • The Fugitive Slave Act of 1850 increased anti-slavery outrage in the North.
  • In December, 1849, most of the speeches made in Congress dealt with the need for a more stringent fugitive slave law.
    Ann Petry  --  Harriet Tubman
  • We know that he refused to denounce the Fugitive Slave Law, viciously unfair though it was, even to free Negroes charged as runaways.
    Richard Hofstadter  --  Abraham Lincoln and the Self-Made Myth
  • What about the Fugitive Slave Law being enforced, said the South?
    John F. Kennedy  --  Profiles in Courage
  • It is the ignorance in which white men compel him to live; it is the torturing whip that lashes manhood out of him; it is the fierce bloodhounds of the South, and the scarcely less cruel human bloodhounds of the north, who enforce the Fugitive Slave Law.
    Harriet Jacobs  --  Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl
  • I told him of the Fugitive Slave Law, and asked him if he did not know that New York was a city of kidnappers.
    Harriet Jacobs  --  Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl
  • I had but one hesitation, and that was feeling of insecurity in New York, now greatly increased by the passage of the Fugitive Slave Law.
    Harriet Jacobs  --  Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl
  • The Fugitive Slave Law had not then passed.
    Harriet Jacobs  --  Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl
  • Northerners, as far as she could tell from what she saw and heard in her travels, had turned the Fugitive Slave Law into a joke.
    Ann Petry  --  Harriet Tubman
  • The Fugitive Slave Law was still in force, though there were few people in the North who would willingly betray a fugitive.
    Ann Petry  --  Harriet Tubman
  • The Fugitive Slave Law was no longer a great many incomprehensible words written down on the country's lawbooks.
    Ann Petry  --  Harriet Tubman
  • Up until 185 1, she was either unaware of the danger posed by the Fugitive Slave Law, or else she ignored it.
    Ann Petry  --  Harriet Tubman
  • Because of the Fugitive Slave Law she was liable to be arrested at any moment even though she was living in a free state.
    Ann Petry  --  Harriet Tubman
  • The Fugitive Slave Law was one of the concessions made to the South as part of the Compromise of 1850.
    Ann Petry  --  Harriet Tubman
  • The Fugitive Slave Law.
    Harriet Jacobs  --  Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl
  • There the talk was about the new Fugitive Slave Law, now three months old, and what it would mean to people like herself and to the people who offered them shelter.
    Ann Petry  --  Harriet Tubman
  • It would be a long trip, longer than any she had ever made, through territory that was strange and new to her, with the known hazard of the Fugitive Slave Law pacing her every footstep.
    Ann Petry  --  Harriet Tubman
  • Few Northerners could stomach any strengthening of the Fugitive Slave Act, the most bitterly hated measure—and untilProhibition, the most flagrantly disobeyed—ever passed by Congress.
    John F. Kennedy  --  Profiles in Courage
  • More important, they said they would work to make the Fugitive Slave Law a joke, make it as worthless as the Compromise of 1820, which the South had agreed to and then junked as part of the Kansas-Nebraska Bill.
    Ann Petry  --  Harriet Tubman
  • The Confederates asked for their rendition under the terms of the Fugitive Slave Law, but they were informed by General Butler that "under the peculiar circumstances, he considered the fugitives 'contraband' of war."
    Ann Petry  --  Harriet Tubman

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