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irony
used in a sentence

3 meanings
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1  —as in:
situational irony
Definition when what happens is very different than what might be expected; or when things seem incongruous together — especially when amusing or an entertaining coincidence
  • She didn't see the irony in acting like the mother she detested.
irony = when what happens is very different than what might be expected
Other Uses (with this meaning)
  • Ironically, he did not do as well when he concentrated on not making mistakes.
  • ironically = when what happens is very different than what might be expected
  • Ironically, her strongest supporters undermined her popularity through their extremism.
  • That would be the crowning irony, if it turns out that girls emerge stronger somehow from having the game rigged against them.
    Affirmative Action for Boys, Time Magazine (4/3/08)  --  Nancy Gibbs  --  http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,1727693,00.html (retrieved 04/15/08)
  • Ironically, those who give up on beating the market and buy an index fund generally outperform those who try to pick the winning stocks.
  • The great irony is that we told him the truth. And now we'll be punished for it.
    Libba Bray  --  A Great and Terrible Beauty
  • irony = when what happens is very different than what might be expected
  • I'd noticed the irony in what all the girls were wearing, which was basically expensive clothes made to look cheap.
    Sarah Dessen  --  Lock and Key
  • irony = when what happens is very different than what might be expected
  • ...it would be too ironical to get killed at the portals of safety.
    Stephen Crane  --  The Red Badge of Courage
  • ironical = when what happens is very different than what might be expected
  • The irony, though, is that that very desire for confidence is precisely what ends up undermining the accuracy of their decision.
    Malcolm Gladwell  --  Blink
  • irony = when what happens is very different than what might be expected
  • The third and related irony is that it's the most complex and neurotic and difficult women that I am invariably drawn to.
    Don DeLillo  --  White Noise
irony = when what happens is very different than what might be expected

Dictionary / pronunciation — Vocabulary.com®Dictionary / synonyms — Google®Dictionary list — Onelook.com®
2  —as in:
verbal irony
Definition saying or writing one thing, while meaning the opposite or something else — usually as humor or sarcasm
  • She was being ironic when she said she couldn't wait to see you again.
ironic = saying or writing one thing, while meaning the opposite or something else — usually as humor or sarcasm
Other Uses (with this meaning)
  • Her voice was dripping with irony as she said, "You look beautiful."
  • irony = saying one thing, while meaning the opposite
  • Madge shoots him a look, trying to see if it's a genuine compliment or if he's just being ironic.
    Suzanne Collins  --  The Hunger Games
  • ironic = saying or writing one thing, while meaning the opposite
  • Nobody in the world could put a gentle nuance of irony into a couple of words better than Poirot.
    Agatha Christie  --  The ABC Murders
  • irony = saying one thing, while meaning the opposite — usually as humor or sarcasm
  • ...he would cloak his words in a tone of irony, as though he did not altogether associate himself with what he was saying.
    Marcel Proust  --  Swann's Way
  • irony = saying or writing one thing, while meaning the opposite — for amusement
  • "Please don't raise any objections. I am doing this for my own sake," she said ironically, letting it be felt that she was doing it all for his sake and only said this to leave him no right to refuse.
    Leo Tolstoy  --  The Death of Ivan Ilych
  • ironically = saying one thing, while meaning the opposite
  • To clear the air Tomas came out with as sprightly a "Fine, just fine!" as he could muster, but he immediately felt that no matter how hard he tried (in fact, because he tried so hard), his "fine" sounded bitterly ironic.
    Milan Kundera  --  The Unbearable Lightness of Being
  • ironic = saying or writing one thing, while meaning the opposite
  • "So, you got a girlfriend?" ... "I mean, there's quite an array of babes to choose from." He meant this to be ironic. He couldn't picture ... Crake with one of them....
    Margaret Atwood  --  Oryx and Crake
  • ironic = saying or writing one thing, while meaning the opposite
  • Gawaine's mind did not move easily along the paths of irony, so he accepted the sneer as statement of fact.
    T. H. White  --  The Once and Future King
  • irony = saying or writing one thing, while meaning the opposite or something else
  • "Whose fault is that?" said Lheureux, bowing ironically.
    Gustave Flaubert  --  Madame Bovary
ironically = saying one thing, while meaning the opposite

Dictionary / pronunciation — Vocabulary.com®Dictionary / synonyms — Google®Dictionary list — Onelook.com®
3  —as in:
dramatic irony
Definition when the meaning of a situation is understood by the reader or audience but not by the characters in the story (such as in the play, Romeo and Juliet)
  • The scene is filled with dramatic irony since the audience, unlike Romeo, knows that Juliet is not really dead.
dramatic irony = when the meaning of a situation is understood by the reader or audience but not by the characters in the story (such as in the play, Romeo and Juliet)
Other Uses (with this meaning)
  • The dramatic irony builds as we wait for him to realize...
  • dramatic irony = when the meaning of a situation is understood by the reader or audience but not by the characters in the story (such as in the play, Romeo and Juliet)
  • Well, I'm in the library parsing a Jane Austen novel looking for dramatic irony, while many of my old friends are dead or in jail.
    Jay Allison, et al.  --  This I Believe II
  • dramatic irony = when the meaning of a situation is understood by the reader or audience but not by the characters in the story
  • ...a remark made by Alfred Nobel in August 1892: "On the day when two army corps may mutually annihilate each other in a second, probably all civilized nations will recoil with horror and disband their troops." The dramatic irony is rich.
    Whirled Peace, Time Magazine (3/13/08)  --  Lev Grossman  --  http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,1722286,00.html (retrieved 04/15/08)
  • There is a type of situation, which occurs all too often and which is occurring at this point in the story of the Baudelaire orphans, called "dramatic irony."
    Lemony Snicket  --  The Reptile Room
  • Simply put, dramatic irony is when a person makes a harmless remark, and someone else who hears it knows something that makes the remark have a different, and usually unpleasant, meaning.
    Lemony Snicket  --  The Reptile Room
  • As you and I listen to Uncle Monty tell the three Baudelaire orphans that no harm will ever come to them in the Reptile Room, we should be experiencing the strange feeling that accompanies the arrival of dramatic irony.
    Lemony Snicket  --  The Reptile Room
  • However, you and I remember that Uncle Monty's promise was laden with dramatic irony, and now, here in the early-morning gloom of the Reptile Room, that irony was going to come to fruition, a phrase which here means "the Baudelaires were finally to learn of it."
    Lemony Snicket  --  The Reptile Room
  • Dramatic irony is a cruel occurrence, one that is almost always upsetting, and I'm sorry to have it appear in this story, but Violet, Klaus, and Sunny have such unfortunate lives that it was only a matter of time before dramatic irony would rear its ugly head.
    Lemony Snicket  --  The Reptile Room
  • Dramatic irony is a cruel occurrence, one that is almost always upsetting, and I'm sorry to have it appear in this story, but Violet, Klaus, and Sunny have such unfortunate lives that it was only a matter of time before dramatic irony would rear its ugly head.
    Lemony Snicket  --  The Reptile Room

Dictionary / pronunciation — Vocabulary.com®Dictionary / synonyms — Google®Dictionary list — Onelook.com®
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