toggle menu
menu
vocabulary
1000+ books

imbibe
used in a sentence

(click/touch triangles for details)
Definition to take in — especially to drink alcohol or be influenced by ideas
  • I try to eat before I imbibe and then drink plenty of water.
imbibe = drink alcohol
  • Those imbibing that much in hard liquor showed faster memory decline than those drinking the same amount of beer or wine.
  • imbibing = drinking
  • The books you imbibe will influence who you become.
  • imbibe = take in (read)
  • The study indicates that when people imbibe can be as important as how much alcohol they consume. A woman who regularly has three-to-four drinks one night a week has an 80% higher risk of breast cancer than a woman who regularly has three-to-four weeks over the course of a week.
  • imbibe = drink alcohol
  • I spent the whole night imbibing short YouTube videos of cats.
  • imbibing = taking in (watching)
  • She imbibed through the holidays, but gave up drinking as a New Year's resolution.
  • imbibed = drank alcohol
  • She grew to have a dread of children; for they had imbibed from their parents a vague idea of something horrible in this dreary woman gliding silently through the town, with never any companion but one only child.
    Nathaniel Hawthorne  --  The Scarlet Letter
  • imbibed = taken in (learned)
  • Hester Prynne imbibed this spirit.
    Nathaniel Hawthorne  --  The Scarlet Letter
  • imbibed = took in
  • Hester could only account for the child's character—and even then most vaguely and imperfectly—by recalling what she herself had been during that momentous period while Pearl was imbibing her soul from the spiritual world, and her bodily frame from its material of earth.
    Nathaniel Hawthorne  --  The Scarlet Letter
  • imbibing = filling
  • Now Pearl knew well enough who made her, for Hester Prynne, the daughter of a pious home, very soon after her talk with the child about her Heavenly Father, had begun to inform her of those truths which the human spirit, at whatever stage of immaturity, imbibes with such eager interest.
    Nathaniel Hawthorne  --  The Scarlet Letter
  • imbibes = takes in
  • Hey, you think if later on, after everybody's imbibed freely, could I ask the band to let me do a number?"
    J.D. Robb  --  Glory in Death
  • If only he could imbibe some of that night rest!
    Gish Jen  --  Typical American
  • At Alton he stepped out of the carriage at his servant's request and imbibed some of the ale for which the place is famous.
    William Makepeace Thackeray  --  Vanity Fair
  • Cedric Jennings shows up for several parties and doesn't imbibe.
    Ron Suskind  --  A Hope in the Unseen
  • I am sure you have, somehow or other, imbibed such a notion.
    Jane Austen  --  Persuasion
  • C.)' — the parentheses always referring to Dora, who was supposed, it appeared on explanation, to have imbibed the whole of these refreshments.
    Charles Dickens  --  David Copperfield
  • Hurd had been imbibing red liquor and Harkaway had no intention of avoiding trouble.
    Zane Grey  --  The Thundering Herd
  • Much that the white boy imbibes from his earliest social atmosphere forms the puzzling problems of the black boy's mature years.
    W. E. B. Du Bois  --  The Souls of Black Folk
  • The ride from Stonebridge was a long and hard one, calculated to wear off the effects of the whisky imbibed by the adventure-seekers.
    Zane Grey  --  The Rainbow Trail
  • It was not long before the imbibing began to tell.
    Theodore Dreiser  --  Sister Carrie

Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary list — Onelook.com®
Search for other examples by interest
InterestSource
General — Google News®
General — Time® Magazine
General — Twitter®